Bisphenol-A BPA found in Breast Milk

Infant BPA Exposure from Breast Milk Now Widespread

Infant BPA Exposure from Breast Milk Now Widespread
Real exposure level of infants or children to BPA is expected to be heavier than those of adults

South Korean researchers have confirmed that a majority of infants are now being exposed to Bisphenol-A – a well-known endocrine disruptor – through their breast milk. Although current exposure levels of BPA are “safe” , they suggest continuous biomonitoring of them to clarify their unclear health risk on neonates and pregnant or gestation mothers.

2013 Study Abstract

Bisphenol A (BPA) and alkylphenols (APs) are well-known endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) which may threat the next generations’ health. We performed biomonitoring of these phenols in colostrums to assess risk of the phenols in breast-fed neonates. Study subjects were the lactating mothers who delivered babies within 2 weeks (N = 325; 30.67 ± 3.45 years) and their neonates (N = 326; embryonic period, 39.1 ± 1.5 weeks). BPA, nonylphenol (NP), and octylphenol (OP) in colostrums were quantified with LC/MS/MS. Information for environmental exposure sources of the phenols was obtained by questionnaires. As results, median level of BPA in colostrums was 7.8 ng/mL, while most NP or OP was not detected. Regarding health risks of phenols, levels of total NP in colostrums were elevated among sick mothers with toxemia, thyroid disorders, gastritis, and so forth than health mothers (3.51 ± 4.98 versus 2.04 ± 3.71 ng/mL, P = 0.02). Dairy products intake and detergents use were positively correlated with total BPA levels (Ps < 0.05). In conclusion, we estimate most neonates who are exposed to BPA rather than NP or OP via colostrums and recommend continuous biomonitoring of the phenols to clarify their suspected health risk on neonates and pregnant or gestation mothers.

Author: DES Daughter

Activist, blogger and social media addict committed to shedding light on a global health scandal and dedicated to raise DES awareness.

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