Reproductive and gynecologic surgical Experience in DiEthylStilbestrol-exposed Daughters

American journal of obstetrics and gynecology, 1981

Reproductive and gynecologic surgical experience in diethylstilbestrol-exposed daughters
Higher proportion of premature births, spontaneous abortions, and ectopic pregnancies in the DES Daughters

Information on reproductive history, gynecologic operations, and examinations was analyzed for 338 diethylstilbestrol (DES)-exposed and 298 unexposed women whose mothers participated in an evaluation of DES use in pregnancy 28 years ago. A history of infrequent menses (less often than every 36 days) was reported more commonly by the exposed women (32%) than by the unexposed women (15%) and the mean duration of menstrual flow was also less. A greater number of exposed women than unexposed women experienced primary infertility (53 versus 19). The reasons for these differences are not currently known. Comparison of the outcomes of first pregnancies showed a higher proportion of premature births, spontaneous abortions, and ectopic pregnancies in the exposed women (P less than 0.001). The difference in the occurrence of ectopic pregnancies was statistically significant (8 versus 0; P less than 0.005). An adverse pregnancy outcome was more likely in DES-exposed women with cervicovaginal ridges. However, when the outcome of all pregnancies were considered, 81% of the exposed women had at least one living child. More exposed women than unexposed women had gynecologic surgical procedures, which may, in part, be due to the increased medical surveillance of the exposed group. The spectrum of diseases at operation in both groups was similar. Adnexal masses and pelvic inflammatory disease were more commonly reported among the exposed women while the occurrence of endometriosis in both groups was similar. For the exposed women who had been examined at the Chicago Lying-In Hospital over a 4-year period, epithelial changes in the vagina had disappeared in 32% and cervicovaginal ridges had disappeared in 57%.

Sources: Reproductive and gynecologic surgical experience in diethylstilbestrol-exposed daughters, NCBI, Dr Herbst A, Dec 1981

More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Le Distilbène en France: un Scandale au long Cours

Aujourd’hui, on étudie enfin les effets à long terme du DES

Le Distilbène en France : un scandale au long cours
La Recherche Mensuel nº 476

Après vous avoir annonçé “en Kiosque” La Recherche mensuel n°476 daté juin 2013 sur le sujet Perturbateurs endocriniens: comment ils menacent notre santé, le blog OSI Bouaké vient de publier l’intégralité de l’article original écrit par Emmanuelle Fillion et Didier Torny…

Lisez Le Distilbène en France : un scandale au long cours.

Sources: article original publié par La Recherche numéro 476.

Le Distilbène DES, en savoir plus

Brazil’s new Generation of Thalidomide Babies

The drug Thalidomide is still causing birth defects in Brazil today

Brazil's new generation of Thalidomide babies
In Brazil Thalidomide drug was re-licensed in 1965 as a treatment for skin lesions, one of the complications of leprosy

A new scientific study seen exclusively by the BBC indicates that the drug Thalidomide is still causing birth defects in Brazil today. It’s been given to people suffering from leprosy to ease some of their symptoms, and some women have taken it unaware of the risks they run when pregnant.

About ten thousand Thalidomide babies were born worldwide until the drug was withdrawn in the early 1960s. But in Brazil the drug was re-licensed in 1965 as a treatment for skin lesions, one of the complications of leprosy. Researchers now say 100 Brazilian children have injuries exactly like those caused by Thalidomide.

Read Brazil’s new generation of Thalidomide babies
by Angus Crawford, BBC Newsnight, 24 July 2013.

The Decline in Male Fertility

Scientists Puzzle Over Declining Sperm Counts; a ‘Crisis’ or Not Enough Data?

The Decline in Male Fertility
A recent study in France found that the sperm concentration of men decreased by nearly one-third between 1989 and 2005

Are today’s young men less fertile than their fathers were?
A recent study in France found that the sperm concentration of men decreased by nearly one-third between 1989 and 2005.
This follows the findings of several other European health studies that have found that over the past 15 years or so, the sperm counts of healthy men ages 18 to 25 have significantly decreased.

Read The Decline in Male Fertility
by Shirley S Wang, The Wall Street Journal, 15 July 2013.

Related posts:

Shift Work might affect Women’s Menstruation and Fertility

Women who only worked at night also had higher odds for miscarriage

Shift Work Might Affect Women's Periods, Fertility: Study
The stress of fluctuating work hours might also play a role

Shift work may raise a woman’s risk of menstrual and fertility problems, and steady night shifts may boost the odds for miscarriage, a new study suggests.

British researchers analyzed all studies on shift work and reproduction published between 1969 and 2013. The data from more than 119,000 women revealed that those working shifts (alternating shifts, evenings and nights) had a 33% higher risk of menstrual problems and an 80% higher risk of fertility problems than those who worked regular hours.

BPA may destroy Tooth Enamel, making Teeth more susceptible to Pain, Cavities, Decay

Bisphenol-A is also bad for your teeth

BPA: It's also bad for your teeth
BPA may cause white spots and damage to the tooth enamel

Over the past few years, research has linked Bisphenol-A (BPA) to a wide range of adverse health effects such as obesity, behavioral changes, diabetes, early onset puberty, asthma, cardiovascular diseases, reproductive disorders and the development of prostate, breast and uterine cancer.
A new study from researchers in France looked at the effect that BPA can have on tooth enamel and found that BPA may also be destroying our teeth, making them more susceptible to pain, cavities and decay.

Read BPA: It’s also bad for your teeth
by Jenn Savedge, MotherNatureNetwork, 15 Jun 2013.

Pharma mobilising Patient Groups to lobby against Drugs Trials Data Transparency

Leaked memo from industry bodies reveals strategy to combat calls by regulators to force companies to publish results

Big pharma mobilising patients in battle over drugs trials data
Big pharma is mobilising patient groups to lobby against drugs trials data transparency

The pharmaceutical industry has “mobilised” an army of patient groups to lobby against plans to force companies to publish secret documents on drugs trials by asking them to express concern about the risk to public health by non-scientific re-use of data.

That means patient groups go into bat for the industry by raising fears that if full results from drug trials are published, the information might be misinterpreted and cause a health scare.

Read Big pharma mobilising patients in battle over drugs trials data
by Ian Sample, The Guardian, 21 July 2013.

Our posts tagged AllTrials – Ben GoldacreBig Pharma – Gwen Olsen.

Adverse Health Outcomes in Women exposed in Utero to DiEthylStilbestrol

In utero exposure of women to DES is associated with a high lifetime risk of a broad spectrum of adverse health outcomes

2011 Study Abstract:

Adverse health outcomes in women exposed in utero to diethylstilbestrol
High lifetime risk of a broad spectrum of adverse health outcomes in the DES Daughters

BACKGROUND:
Before 1971, several million women were exposed in utero to Diethylstilbestrol (DES) given to their mothers to prevent pregnancy complications. Several adverse outcomes have been linked to such exposure, but their cumulative effects are not well understood.

METHODS:
We combined data from three studies initiated in the 1970s with continued long-term follow-up of 4653 women exposed in utero to DES and 1927 unexposed controls. We assessed the risks of 12 adverse outcomes linked to DES exposure, including cumulative risks to 45 years of age for reproductive outcomes and to 55 years of age for other outcomes, and their relationships to the baseline presence or absence of vaginal epithelial changes, which are correlated with a higher dose of, and earlier exposure to, DES in utero.

RESULTS:
Cumulative risks in women exposed to DES, as compared with those not exposed, were as follows:

  • for infertility, 33.3% vs. 15.5% (hazard ratio, 2.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.05 to 2.75)
  • spontaneous abortion, 50.3% vs. 38.6% (hazard ratio, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.42 to 1.88)
  • preterm delivery, 53.3% vs. 17.8% (hazard ratio, 4.68; 95% CI, 3.74 to 5.86)
  • loss of second-trimester pregnancy, 16.4% vs. 1.7% (hazard ratio, 3.77; 95% CI, 2.56 to 5.54)
  • ectopic pregnancy, 14.6% vs. 2.9% (hazard ratio, 3.72; 95% CI, 2.58 to 5.38)
  • preeclampsia, 26.4% vs. 13.7% (hazard ratio 1.42; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.89)
  • stillbirth, 8.9% vs. 2.6% (hazard ratio, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.33 to 4.54)
  • early menopause, 5.1% vs. 1.7% (hazard ratio, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.67 to 3.31)
  • grade 2 or higher cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, 6.9% vs. 3.4% (hazard ratio, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.59 to 3.27)
  • breast cancer at 40 years of age or older, 3.9% vs. 2.2% (hazard ratio, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.04 to 3.18).

For most outcomes, the risks among exposed women were higher for those with vaginal epithelial changes than for those without such changes.

CONCLUSIONS:
In utero exposure of women to DES is associated with a high lifetime risk of a broad spectrum of adverse health outcomes. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute).

Sources:

More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Once again the FDA fails to protect women from dangerous medical products

Why Few Women Trust the FDA

WHY FEW WOMEN TRUST THE FDA
No, I do not trust the FDA to protect my health” says @ChanatLucine

Critics of Lucine and our e-journal Hormones Matter often suggest that we are biased against the pharmaceutical and medical device industries and that, we should trust the FDA on all matters of women’s health. After all, we wouldn’t want to be considered one of those wacky conspiracy, alternative health blogs or a bunch of mommy bloggers (for reference, I rate moms as some of the best arbiters of BS when it comes to health). Admittedly however, much of the information on the blogosphere is horribly slanted or so devoid of actionable intelligence that it offers no more than pablum – even from the more reputable sources. But I digress. ”

Continue reading: WHY FEW WOMEN TRUST THE FDA
by Chandler Marrs PHD, Hormones Matter, 2 July 2012.

Are Men becoming Less Fertile?

Sperm Counts for Men dropping globally

A recent study in France found that the sperm concentration of men decreased by nearly one-third between 1989 and 2005. This follows the findings of several other European health studies that have found that over the past 15 years or so, the sperm counts of healthy men ages 18 to 25 have significantly decreased.
Possible causes suggested for the sperm crisis include exposure to pesticides or chemicals such as BPA, lifestyle changes in which men sit more than in decades past, obesity, drug and alcohol use, or even the chemicals and toxins that men are exposed to in the womb as babies.