Time-lapse Embryo Imaging may boost IVF Success Rate

CARE’s chief embryologist Alison Campbell explains the benefits of time-lapse imaging

Time-lapse imaging which takes thousands of pictures of developing embryos can boost the success rate of IVF, according to British research.  The method, reported in Reproductive BioMedicine Online, can be used to select embryos at low risk of defects.

Sadly for many DES daughters having their own children is not possible! Many of us who have experienced miscarriages, want to have kids but are struggling or unable to…

Urogenital Abnormalities in Men exposed to DiEthylStilbestrol in Utero

Prenatal exposure to DES increases risk of male urogenital abnormalities

DES Follow-up Study Summary

National Cancer Inst logo image
Prenatal exposure to DES increases risk of male urogenital abnormalities.

One of the most frequently asked questions from DES exposed families is whether the sons have had any adverse health effects. For that reason, our collaborative follow-up has included over 1,000 DES-exposed sons and over 1,000 other men of the same ages who were never exposed to DES. These men have been completing mailed questionnaires on the same schedule as women in the study, in 1994, 1997, 2001, and 2006. Some of the questions are the same and some are different. The men were asked whether they had ever been diagnosed with any of a list of urogenital abnormalities. These abnormalities were studied more than 20 years ago in both the offspring of mothers from the University of Chicago DES clinical trial and in a group of sons born to mothers at the Mayo Clinic. The two studies reported different findings, with the University of Chicago follow-up finding a higher prevalence of abnormalities in the DES-exposed sons and the Mayo Clinic study finding no difference between DES-exposed and unexposed sons. We thought we might be able to clarify this question with data from the entire collaborative cohort – including the Mayo sons, the Chicago sons, and additional sons from women who gave birth in Massachusetts.

We found that urogenital abnormalities were fairly rare among DES-exposed sons, as is true for the general U.S. population. However, DES-exposed sons did have a higher prevalence of both undescended testicle and epididymal cyst. They were two times as likely to have had one of those conditions as were unexposed men. For both of these conditions, the prevalence was highest if son was exposed during the first 10 weeks of gestation. In men born at the Mayo clinic, DES exposure was not significantly associated with these conditions overall, but there was a significant association with undescended testicle and epididymal cyst for sons exposed early in gestation. In the University of Chicago clinical trial, the protocol was to give DES as soon as a pregnancy was identified and for use to continue until the last weeks of pregnancy. This same protocol was typical in Boston and in some other regions of the U.S. It was not the usual protocol at the Mayo Clinic, however, where women usually began DES later in pregnancy and took it for only a few months. Differences in patterns of use may explain the conflicting findings in earlier studies of urogenital abnormalities in sons. Our conclusion is that DES-exposed sons do indeed have a higher risk of certain urogenital abnormalities particularly if they were exposed in the early months of fetal development. Fortunately, we and others have already shown that prenatal DES exposure does not affect fertility in men, even in those men with these urogenital abnormalities.

Because the sons are now adults, they were also asked if they had ever been diagnosed with infection or inflammation of the urogenital organs. Prenatal DES exposure was not associated with occurrence of infection or inflammation of the prostate, urethra, or epididymus, or with benign prostatic hypertrophy (enlarged prostate). DES-exposed sons were approximately two and a half times more likely to have had an infection or inflammation of the testes. We do not know the reasons for such an increase. It is possible that minimal structural abnormalities, such as minor obstructions, could explain the increase in infection and inflammation. We will continue to investigate these conditions, especially benign prostatic hypertrophy, as men in the study grow older.

2009 Study Abstract:

BACKGROUND:
Diethylstilbestrol (DES), a synthetic estrogen widely prescribed to pregnant women during the 1940s70s, has been shown to cause reproductive problems in the daughters. Studies of prenatally-exposed males have yielded conflicting results.

METHODS:
In data from a collaborative follow-up of three U.S. cohorts of DES-exposed sons, we examined the relation of prenatal DES exposure to occurrence of male urogenital abnormalities. Exposure status was determined through review of prenatal records. Mailed questionnaires (1994, 1997, 2001) asked about specified abnormalities of the urogenital tract. Risk ratios (RR) were estimated by Cox regression with constant time at risk and control for year of birth.

RESULTS:
Prenatal DES exposure was not associated with varicocele, structural abnormalities of the penis, urethral stenosis, benign prostatic hypertrophy, or inflammation/infection of the prostate, urethra, or epididymus. However, RRs were 1.9 (95% confidence interval 1.13.4) for cryptorchidism, 2.5 (1.54.3) for epididymal cyst, and 2.4 (1.54.4) for testicular inflammation/infection. Stronger associations were observed for DES exposure that began before the 11th week of pregnancy: RRs were 2.9 (1.65.2) for cryptorchidism, 3.5 (2.06.0) for epididymal cyst, and 3.0 (1.75.4) for inflammation/infection of testes.

CONCLUSION:
These results indicate that prenatal exposure to DES increases risk of male urogenital abnormalities and that the association is strongest for exposure that occurs early in gestation. The findings support the hypothesis that endocrine disrupting chemicals may be a cause of the increased prevalence of cryptorchidism that has been seen in recent years.

Sources:

  • Urogenital abnormalities in men exposed to diethylstilbestrol in utero: a cohort study,NCBI, PMID: 19689815, 2009 Aug 18;8:37. doi: 10.1186/1476-069X-8-37. Full text PMC2739506.
  • NCI, DES Follow-up Study Published Papers.
More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Bisphenol-A: reduce Your own BPA Levels by Sixty Percent in just Three Days

Five Tips to reduce your Source of BPA Exposure

How to reduce BPA levels by 60 percent in 3 days
How to reduce BPA levels by 60% in 3 days

Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a synthetic estrogen like DES, used in the lining of most food cans and in some plastic packaging, linked to breast cancer, reproductive problems, obesity, ADHD, immune system harm and other serious health issues.

Here is what you can do:

  • Switch to glass for food storage and beverage containers
  • Use glass for microwaving
  • Consider a French press for coffee
  • Limit canned food consumption
  • Choose fresh fruits and vegetables when possible

For more tips, read How to reduce BPA levels by 60 percent in 3 days, Inside Prevention, 29 March 2011.

Young Cancer Survivors may have better Pregnancy Odds than previously thought

nfertility, infertility treatment, and achievement of pregnancy in female survivors of childhood cancer

Young Cancer Survivors may have better #Pregnancy Odds than previously thought
Nearly 2/3 of cancer survivors who met the standards for clinical infertility were eventually able to conceive, the study finds

Women who had cancer as children are at greater risk for infertility.

There’s encouraging news for these women, however, in a study published in Lancet Oncology this week, which found that nearly two-thirds of those who tried and failed to get pregnant for at least one year eventually went on to conceive.

Read Young Cancer Survivors may have better Pregnancy Odds than previously thought, by Catherine Pearson, HuffPost Women, 07/16/2013.

Sources: Infertility, infertility treatment, and achievement of pregnancy in female survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort
The Lancet Oncology, Early Online Publication, 13 July 2013.

Sadly for many DES daughters having their own children is not possible! Many of us who have experienced miscarriages, want to have kids but are struggling or unable to…

Medical Conditions among Adult Offspring prenatally exposed to DiEthylStilbestrol

DES Follow-up Study Summary

National Cancer Inst logo image
DES side-effects on Offspring exposed in Utero.

Concern about the possible impact of estrogen-like substances found in the environment on a range of health conditions has spurred research in this area. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is an example of an endocrine-disruptor i.e., chemicals that interfere with the body’s hormone system. While prenatal exposure to DES is known to increase risks of vaginal or cervical cancer and poor reproductive outcomes in women, and abnormalities in the urinary and genital tracts in men information on non-reproductive medical conditions are lacking.

We studied the associations between prenatal DES exposure and the occurrence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, osteoporosis and related conditions among 5,590 exposed and unexposed daughters and 2,657 exposed and unexposed sons in the NCI Combined DES Follow-up Study. The associations took into account the participants’ birth year, sex, weight adjusted for height, smoking status, alcohol use, educational status, number of general physical examinations in the past 5 years, and study site.

Comparing participants exposed prenatally to DES with those who were not exposed, there were increases in the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (27%), heart attacks (28%), hypertension (14%), and high cholesterol (12%). In addition, the risks of developing diabetes, coronary artery disease, osteoporosis and fractures were elevated, but these findings were possibly due to chance. The associations of DES and the medical conditions did not differ by dose and timing of DES exposure, nor, in the women, by presence or absence of vaginal epithelial changes (a marker of DES host susceptibility).

This study raises the possibility that prenatal DES exposure is associated with several common medical conditions in adulthood, although there is the possibility that our results are explained by differences in the reporting of conditions by the exposed and unexposed participants, or by other factors related to both the conditions and DES exposure status that were not accounted for in the study, such as dietary intake and physical activity. We plan to continue to study these associations by obtaining medical records to confirm the diagnoses in the current round of the study.

DES Info commented: ” DES Exposure estimated hazard ratios and their associated 95% confidence intervals for the associations between prenatal DES exposure and the occurrence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, and related conditions among 5590 female and 2657 male offspring followed from 1994 through 2006, adjusted for birth year, cohort, sex, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol use, education, and number of general physical examinations in the past 5 years “.

2013 Study Abstract:

BACKGROUND:
Diethylstilbestrol (DES), a synthetic estrogen that was used in pregnancy, is a prototype endocrine-disrupting chemical. Although prenatal exposure to DES is known to increase risks of vaginal/cervical adenocarcinoma and adverse reproductive outcomes in women, and urogenital anomalies in men, data on nonreproductive medical conditions are lacking.

METHODS:
We estimated hazard ratios and their associated 95% confidence intervals for the associations between prenatal DES exposure and the occurrence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, and related conditions among 5590 female and 2657 male offspring followed from 1994 through 2006, adjusted for birth year, cohort, sex, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol use, education, and number of general physical examinations in the past 5 years.

RESULTS:
Comparing persons exposed prenatally to DES with those who were not exposed, the hazard ratios were 1.21 (95% confidence interval = 0.96-1.54) for diabetes, 1.27 (1.00-1.62) for all cardiovascular disease, 1.18 (0.88-1.59) for coronary artery disease, 1.28 (0.88-1.86) for myocardial infarction, 1.12 (1.02-1.22) for high cholesterol, 1.14 (1.02-1.28) for hypertension, 1.24 (0.99-1.54) for osteoporosis, and 1.30 (0.95-1.79) for fractures. The associations did not differ by dose and timing of DES exposure, nor, in the women, by the presence or absence of vaginal epithelial changes (a marker of DES host susceptibility).

CONCLUSIONS:
These data raise the possibility that prenatal exposure to DES is associated with several common medical conditions in adulthood, although differential reporting by DES status and residual confounding cannot be ruled out. Further follow-up should assess these findings with validated outcomes and seek to understand the biological mechanisms.

Sources:

  • Medical conditions among adult offspring prenatally exposed to diethylstilbestrol,NCBI, PMID: 23474687, 2013 May;24(3):430-8. doi: 10.1097/EDE.0b013e318289bdf7. Full text link.
  • NCI, DES Follow-up Study Published Papers.
More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

BPA-free Plastics going on Trial in Texas

Are BPA-free plastics really safe?

BPA-Free Plastics Going On Trial In Texas
PlastiPure helps manufacturers create water bottles and other plastic products that have no estrogenic activity

Scientists and lawyers are scheduled to debate the safety of certain “BPA-free” plastics this week in a U.S. District Court in Austin, Texas.

At issue is whether a line of plastic resins marketed by Eastman Chemical contains chemicals that can act like the hormone estrogen, and perhaps cause health problems.

Read BPA-Free Plastics Going On Trial In Texas, NPR Shots
by Jon Hamilton, 15 July 2013.

Related post:
Are BPA-free Plastics really safe?

“T” shaped Uterus and small-size cavity after being exposed in Utero to DES DiEthylStilbestrol

T shape uterus, specifically DES drug related, proof of DES-exposure

T” shaped uterus and small-size cavity after being exposed in utero to DES – Copyright © Pr P-J Weiller

DES-exposed women with a T-shaped uterus who want to improve their reproductive function should be encouraged to undergo hysteroscopic metroplasty.

DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Pregnant Women may have more Options for Health Care under the Affordable Care Act

Can a health plan refuse to let me enroll because I’m pregnant?

Health Insurance When You're Pregnant: FAQ
Pregnant women will benefit

The new health insurance law, known as the Affordable Care Act, is expanding health care. It’s also giving people more protection from unfair insurance hikes. Pregnant women will benefit. They’ll have more choices to get affordable health insurance. And they may get more benefits, too.

Read Health Insurance When You’re Pregnant: FAQ
by WebMD, July 2013.

AbbVieing or the Opposite of Boycotting

A good medicine is a good chemical plus good information

Lets do the AbbVie again
AbbVieing is the opposite of Boycotting

Dr David Healy says that it’s time for another invention – the #AbbVie. AbbVieing is named after the pharmaceutical company AbbVie (NYSE:ABBV) – the recent spun-off entity of Abbott Laboratories. It is almost the opposite of Boycotting.

Far from shunning and not mentioning AbbVie or their drugs, Dr David Healy call on everyone taking an AbbVie or InterMune drug, listed on his post, to talk loudly about them by reporting to RxISK any side effects they may be having on these medications. Dr David Healy want us to talk about these drugs and to their companies.

Are BPA-free Plastics really safe?

Most Plastic Products release Estrogenic Chemicals…

Are BPA-Free Plastics Really Safe?
Scientists suspect thousands of chemicals may be estrogenically active

BPA is only part of the story. For their study, researchers tested more than 500 BPA-free consumer products for other estrogenically active chemicals and found that 92 % of the products readily leached the potentially hazardous compounds. Leaching was more common when products experienced ordinary stresses like dishwashing, microwaving and exposure to sunlight.

2011 Study Abstract

Background
Chemicals having estrogenic activity (EA) reportedly cause many adverse health effects, especially at low (picomolar to nanomolar) doses in fetal and juvenile mammals.

Objectives
We sought to determine whether commercially available plastic resins and products, including baby bottles and other products advertised as bisphenol A (BPA) free, release chemicals having EA.

Methods
We used a roboticized MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, which is very sensitive, accurate, and repeatable, to quantify the EA of chemicals leached into saline or ethanol extracts of many types of commercially available plastic materials, some exposed to common-use stresses (microwaving, ultraviolet radiation, and/or autoclaving).

Results
Almost all commercially available plastic products we sampled—independent of the type of resin, product, or retail source—leached chemicals having reliably detectable EA, including those advertised as BPA free. In some cases, BPA-free products released chemicals having more EA than did BPA-containing products.

Conclusions
Many plastic products are mischaracterized as being EA free if extracted with only one solvent and not exposed to common-use stresses. However, we can identify existing compounds, or have developed, monomers, additives, or processing agents that have no detectable EA and have similar costs. Hence, our data suggest that EA-free plastic products exposed to common-use stresses and extracted by saline and ethanol solvents could be cost-effectively made on a commercial scale and thereby eliminate a potential health risk posed by most currently available plastic products that leach chemicals having EA into food products.