Bisphenol-A: the Dangers of Prenatal BPA Exposure

Compelling need for a precautionary approach to avoid human exposure to BPA during prenatal development

The Science Indicates the Need for a Precautionary Approach

Disrupted Development: The Dangers of Prenatal BPA Exposure
The 2013 Breast Cancer Fund Report

The combination of human-association studies and experimental studies in animals provide compelling evidence that low-dose, prenatal exposures to Bisphenol-A (BPA) can lead to a wide range of later-life health concerns. These health effects encompass a wide range of adverse outcomes, including altered brain development, behavior changes, metabolic changes, adverse reproductive outcomes, and changes in breast and prostate development linked to later-life cancer risk in these organs. This collection of health effects is biologically plausible,138 given BPA’s capacity to mimic estrogen, and to therefore disrupt the delicate process of fetal development that is orchestrated by hormones. While inter-species differences may exist in the absorption and metabolism of BPA, the weight of the compiled evidence suggests that viable routes of exposure to active BPA exist for humans. This indicates a compelling need for a precautionary approach to avoid human exposure to BPA during prenatal development.

A 2013 Report by the Breast Cancer Fund

  • Protecting Us from BPA = Protecting the Next Generation
  • A Brief History of BPA
  • Prenatal Exposure to BPA: Exploring the Science
  • DES: A Cautionary Tale
  • Health Effects of Prenatal BPA Exposure
  • Table 1. Prenatal BPA Exposure and Biological Effects in Animals
  • Table 2. Prenatal BPA Exposure and Health Associations in Humans
  • Solutions: Getting BPA out of Food Packaging
  • Alternatives to BPA
  • APPENDIX 1 – Maternal BPA Levels in Humans
  • APPENDIX 2 – Prenatal BPA Levels in Humans
  • APPENDIX 3 – Research Methods: Making Sense of Animal and Human Studies

Sources: Breast Cancer Fund’s report ” Disrupted Development: The Dangers of Prenatal BPA Exposure “, a comprehensive review of the scientific literature on prenatal BPA exposure, Sptember 2013.

More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Author: DES Daughter

Activist, blogger and social media addict committed to shedding light on a global health scandal and dedicated to raise DES awareness.

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