The FDA Process for approving New Drugs…

Dan Berger is Cartoonist behind Natural News

The FDA Process for approving New Drugs
Sources: The FDA drug approval process
by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger

Related post: FDA’s Drug Approval Process: many Drugs Ineffective, all with Side Effects…

Pharma Firms shifting to Software-oriented E-Detailing for Doctors faster Reach, Sales Efficiancy

Big Pharma is moving away from the traditional reliance on sales reps (MRs) to sell their products to the medical fraternity

Med representative's job partly vanishing
Breaking news on economy, companies and markets

Pharmaceutical companies are moving away from the traditional reliance on medical representatives (MRs) to sell their products to the medical fraternity. Instead, they are gradually shifting to software-oriented e-detailing. The reach to doctors is supposed to be faster, helps reinforce recall and improve sales force efficiency…

Read Med representative’s job partly vanishing
Business Standard Ltd., 15 Oct 2013

All our posts tagged Doctors and Pharmaceutical industry

Vulvar Cancer: the Cancer no One talks about

Author Darci Picoult personal Essay

I Had the Cancer No One Talks About
Personal Stories

” …Sensation is returning! Slowly but surely my nerves are regenerating. A cause for celebration, the human body reviving itself. Some get a new heart and it beats, a new limb and it moves. In my case, a new vulva and it feels. Am I excited? You bet. My doctor? Ditto. And my husband, Larry? Did you hear trombones playing all the way from our house in Brooklyn?…”

Continue reading: An Exciting Update From the Author Who Had The Cancer No One Talks About
by Darci Picoult, journalist, DES daughter and author of My Virginia

More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Perturbateurs Endocriniens: la solution pour vite tester 800 substances suspectes

Les perturbateurs endocriniens courent toujours

Les perturbateurs endocriniens courent toujours
Antidote Europe, comité scientifique pour une science responsable

Le comité scientifique d’ Antidote Europe propose une méthode éthique et rapide – la toxicogénomique – pour évaluer les perturbateurs endocriniens non pas sur des rongeurs, mais sur des cellules humaines en culture, de façon fiable pour l’homme et reproductible.
Cette méthode alternative à l’expérimentation animale d’évaluer facilement des milliers de substances par an pour un coût de l’ordre du millième de celui des tests sur des animaux. La toxicogénomique est parfaitement adaptée pour évaluer les effets des substances pures, de leurs métabolites et de leurs mélanges, sur l’homme, la femme, les bébés, les enfants, les adolescents, les adultes et les séniors, en plus selon leurs ethnies.

Lire Les perturbateurs endocriniens courent toujours
Antidote Europe, 26 septembre 2013

Plus sur le BPA – pesticides – perturbateurs endocriniens

IntraCytoplasmic Sperm Injection, easier IVF Technique, is being used too widely

Survival of the unfittest: IVF technique ‘used too widely’, watchdog warns

Survival of the unfittest: IVF technique 'used too widely', watchdog warns
Lisa Jardine, who chairs the HFEA, said that some IVF clinics are using the ICSI technique simply because it is easier than standard IVF, rather than because it is in the best interests of patients.

An In Vitro Fertilization technique for injecting sperm directly into unfertilised eggs to increase the chances of a successful IVF pregnancy is being used too widely by some fertility clinics, the head of the Government’s fertility watchdog has warned. Intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) involves injecting a single sperm directly into an egg in order to fertilise it. The fertilised egg (embryo) is then transferred to the woman’s womb.

Lisa Jardine, who chairs the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), said that some IVF clinics are using the ICSI technique simply because it is easier than standard IVF, rather than because it is in the best interests of patients.

Read Survival of the unfittest: IVF technique ‘used too widely’, watchdog warns, The Independent, 3 Nov 2013

More about Fertility – IVF – Pregnancy – Surrogacy

Sadly for many DES daughters having their own children is not possible! Many of us who have experienced miscarriages, want to have kids but are struggling or unable to…
Read DES studies on fertility and pregnancy.

Brisdelle and Paxil : the Continuing Exploitation Of Menopausal Women

Worst Pills Best Pills, by Dr. Sidney Wolfe

The Continuing Exploitation Of Menopausal Women
Public Citizen HRG, “Protecting your health since 1972”

Medicalizing a normal phase of women’s lives — menopause — for the purpose of selling drugs began decades ago, and it continues on relentlessly. To wit: according to extensive advertising by the drug company Noven, menopausal women will this month have access to “the first and only FDA-approved non-hormonal therapy for moderate to severe hot flashes associated with menopause.”

Continue reading The Continuing Exploitation Of Menopausal Women, by Dr. Sidney Wolfe on DES Info FB Page.

Sources: Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles, November 2013.

All our posts about Estrogen – HRT – Menopause

Nothing to worry about?

Pharmaceutical is doing everything it can to change that…

It looks like you have nothing to worry about!
via @Addifaerber

It looks like you have nothing to worry about!

via @Addifaerber’s tweet on 10 Sep 13 – 3:48 PM

What the Medical Industry fails to tell Women about Mammograms

What Every Woman Ought to Know About Mammography But Usually Doesn’t

Starting with a quote from Mark Twain:

Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it’s time to pause and reflect

What Every Woman Ought to Know About Mammography But Usually Doesn’t
What the Medical Industry fails to tell Women about mammograms

Author Rolf Hefti covers the following points on NaturalNewsBlog:

  • Here Is What The Medical Industry Fails To Tell Women About Mammograms
  • Medical Research: Vehicle For Commercial Advertisements
  • Most Doctors (Unwittingly) Misinform Their Patients About Mammograms
  • Breast Cancer Awareness Groups & The Mainstream Media Are Complicit In Spreading The Medical Orthodoxy’s Disinformation On Mammography
  • Acting According To The Teaching Of A Famous Saying

Read What Every Woman Ought to Know About Mammography But Usually Doesn’t, by Rolf Hefti, 24 Oct 2013

Related post: Mammography Screening: Truth, Lies and Controversy

The Dirty Dozen List of Endocrine Disruptors

Twelve Hormone-Altering Chemicals and How to Avoid Them

The Environmental Working Group and the Keep A Breast Foundation released a guide to educate consumers about some of the most problematic hormone-altering chemicals that people are routinely exposed to. EWG, known for creating the popular and widely used list of the most pesticide-contaminated fresh produce, partnered with KAB to develop the Dirty Dozen list of endocrine disruptors to highlight the prevalence of these toxic chemicals, how they affect our health and simple ways to avoid them.

Includes:

12 Hormone-Altering Chemicals and How to Avoid Them
Twelve Hormone-Altering Chemicals and How to Avoid Them
  1. Bisphenol-A (BPA)
  2. Dioxin
  3. Atrazine
  4. Phthalates
  5. Perchlorate
  6. Fire retardants
  7. Lead
  8. Arsenic
  9. Mercury
  10. Perfluorinated chemicals
  11. Organophosphate pesticides
  12. Glycol ethers

More information and how to avoid them:

Fetal AntiEpileptic Drug Exposure: Adaptive and Emotional/Behavioral Functioning at Age 6 Years

Children of mothers who took valproate during their pregnancy are at a significantly greater risk for a diagnosis of ADHD

Fetal antiepileptic drug exposure: Adaptive and emotional/behavioral functioning at age 6years
Significant differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist in children whose mothers took valproate during pregnancy

Abstract:
The Neurodevelopmental Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs (NEAD) study is a prospective observational multicenter study in the USA and UK, which enrolled pregnant women with epilepsy on antiepileptic drug (AED) monotherapy from 1999 to 2004. The study aimed to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across four commonly used AEDs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, and valproate).

In this report, we examine fetal AED exposure effects on adaptive and emotional/behavioral functioning at 6 years of age in 195 children (including three sets of twins) whose parent (in most cases, the mother) completed at least one of the rating scales. Adjusted mean scores for the four AED groups were in the low average to average range for parent ratings of adaptive functioning on the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-Second Edition (ABAS-II) and for parent and teacher ratings of emotional/behavioral functioning on the Behavior Assessment System for Children (BASC). However, children whose mothers took valproate during pregnancy had significantly lower General Adaptive Composite scores than the lamotrigine and phenytoin groups. Further, a significant dose-related performance decline in parental ratings of adaptive functioning was seen for both valproate and phenytoin. Children whose mothers took valproate were also rated by their parents as exhibiting significantly more atypical behaviors and inattention than those in the lamotrigine and phenytoin groups. Based upon BASC parent and teacher ratings of attention span and hyperactivity, children of mothers who took valproate during their pregnancy were at a significantly greater risk for a diagnosis of ADHD.

The increased likelihood of difficulty with adaptive functioning and ADHD with fetal valproate exposure should be communicated to women with epilepsy who require antiepileptic medication. Finally, additional research is needed to confirm these findings in larger prospective study samples, examine potential risks associated with other AEDs, better define the risks to the neonate that are associated with AEDs for treatment of seizures, and understand the underlying mechanisms of adverse AED effects on the immature brain.

Sources: Fetal antiepileptic drug exposure: Adaptive and emotional/behavioral functioning at age 6years, NCBI, Nov 2013

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