Follow-up Study of Male and Female Offspring of DES-exposed Mothers

Effects of Diethylstilbestrol on the genital tract of male and female offspring

Abstract #1:

Follow-up study of male and female offspring of DES-exposed mothers
Follow-up study of male and female offspring of DES-exposed mothers

1975 – This is a follow-up study of male and female offspring of mothers who were part of a double-blind placebo controlled investigation during the years 1951-1952, originally aimed at determining the usefulness of Diethylstilbestrol (DES) administration in maintaining pregnancy.

  • So far, 84 DES-exposed females, 43 female controls, 42 DES-exposed males and 37 male controls have been examined.
  • Circumferential ridges of the vagina and cervix were seen in 39% of the DES-exposed females but in none of the controls.
  • Colposcopy revealed vaginal epitheleal changes in 78% of the DES-exposed females 2% of the female controls.
  • Cytology proved to be reliable as a screening test for vaginal epithelial changes in the DES-exposed female.
  • Urine cytology was negative for tumor cells in all patients.
  • The main abnormal finding in the DES-exposed males was that cysts in the epididymis were detected in 10%.
  • No cases of cancer were observed in either the male or female offspring.

Abstract #2:

1977 – This follow-up study presents the effects of DES on the genital tract of male and female offspring of mothers who were part of a double-blind, placebo-controlled investigation during 1951 and 1952 aimed at determining the effect of DES on pregnancy.

  • Epididymal cysts, hypotrophic testes, and capsular induration were the more common genital lesions found in 25% of 163 DES-exposed males as compared to 6% in 168 control males.
  • Semen analysis data on 39 subjects of the DES-exposed group and 25 subjects of the control group showed that 26% of the DES-exposed group produced an ejaculate volume under 1.5 ml; no such cases were observed in the control group.
  • The average values for sperm density ant total motile spermatozoa per ejaculate, although in the normal range, were more than two times lower in the DES-exposed group as compared to the controls.
  • A quality score of greater than 10 (“severely pathologic semen“) was found in 28% of the DES-exposed group as compared to 0 in the control group.
  • An association of pathologic semen quality with physical abnormalities was found only in the DES-exposed group.
  • Two cases of azoospermia, one without genital abnormalities on physical examination and one with bilateral hypotrophic testes were observed so far in the DES-exposed group.
  • Eighteen percent of 229 DES-exposed female patients had irregular menstrual cycles (oligomenorrhea) as compared to 10% of 136 controls.
  • The history of pregnancy revealed a lower incidence of pregnancy in the DES-exposed group (18%) than in the control group (33%).
  • Circumferential ridges of the vagina and cervix were seen in 40% of 229 DES-exposed females but in none of 136 controls.
  • Colposcopic findings in the vagina revealed adenosis in 66.8% of the DES-exposed females and in 3.6% of the control group.
  • Dysplastic lesions were more prevalent in the vagina and cervix of the DES-exposed subjects.
  • No cases of cancer were observed in either the male or female offspring.

NCBI Sources:

  • Follow-up study of male and female offspring of DES-treated mothers a preliminary report
    J Reprod Med. 1975 Jul;15(1):29-32. PMID: 1171234.
  • Follow-up study of male and female offspring of DES-exposed mothers, Obstet Gynecol. 1977 Jan;49(1):1-8. PMID: 318736.
More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Author: DES Daughter

Activist, blogger and social media addict committed to shedding light on a global health scandal and dedicated to raise DES awareness.

6 thoughts on “Follow-up Study of Male and Female Offspring of DES-exposed Mothers”

  1. It’s challenging to find knowledgeable folks on this topic, but you sound like you know what you’re talking about! Thanks

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