Ovarian Cancer: why did it take so long for some women to find out?

Some wowen were fobbed off with wrong diagnoses and devastating consequences

Why did it take so long for these women to learn they had cancer? They were fobbed off with wrong diagnoses, and the consequences have been devastatingFor years, ovarian cancer has been known as a silent killer.
The disease is often not detected until it has spread.

  • Lynn was told she has a weak pelvic floor.
    By the time she was diagnosed, the tumour was the size of a pineapple, and the cancer had spread.
  • Caz was told she had IBS for years. Angela’s ovarian cancer has spread to her intestines and liver – and she will continue with chemotherapy.
  • Angela was told she had an eating disorder. A different doctor picked up the fact her periods had stopped before she’d lost weight – and cancer was diagnosed and removed.
  • Sue was told she had allergies and a chest infection when she actually had ovarian cancer.

Read Why did it take so long for these women to learn they had cancer? They were fobbed off with wrong diagnoses, and the consequences have been devastating, by Cara Lee, 17 Feb 2014

Our Posts about Cancer – Ovarian Cancer – Women’s Health

Author: DES Daughter

Activist, blogger and social media addict committed to shedding light on a global health scandal and dedicated to raise DES awareness.

4 thoughts on “Ovarian Cancer: why did it take so long for some women to find out?”

  1. I am not sure if people realize that a few males can and do develop forms of ovarian cancer. In my case I have an intersex condition in which one of my testis was undescended fetal ovary or ovo-testes. As an adult it became malignant with stage 3 plus cancer. In addition there where several very large mature teratoma . What the largest located in my upper abdomen and was approximently 14.5cm long. Several surgeries and seven months of chemo have hopefully cured me.
    Intersex people such as myself are at risk for cancers such as this. Doctors at the mayo clinic told me that intersex males have a better cure rate than CIs women but can only speculate as to why.
    I would like to point out that as a child of ten I had my undescended testis repaired and a teratoma or female bits where removed from me at that time. We will never know what was done during that surgery because the medical community kept things like that from parents and children. The truth is I knew I wasn’t just a male by age 9 and I was ok with that. Confused yet ok, if that makes any sense.
    Oh: I’ve been married for over forty years despite hypogonadism, intersex and whatever life has tossed at me.
    David micheletti

    1. Dear David, Thanks for sharing this information and personal experience. So little is known about these issues. Thanks for helping raise awareness about this via our blog. We want our blog-site to be a platform where people can freely share their personal experience and knowledge of the health effects of DES and other prescription drugs side effects as well as general information about these “tabou” cancer.
      We wish you all the best.
      Regards

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