Testing Treatments Interactive free Book, Better Research for Better HealthCare

This book should be in every school, and every medical waiting room says Ben Goldacre

image of Testing Treatments Interactive Book
Click for free download.

The 2nd edition of Testing Treatments was published in 2011. It urges everyone to get involved in improving current research and future treatment, and outlines practical steps that patients and health professionals can take together to do this.

How do we know whether a particular treatment really works? How reliable is the evidence? And how do we ensure that research into medical treatments best meets the needs of patients? These are just a few of the questions addressed in a lively and informative way in the free book written by Imogen Evans, Hazel Thornton, Sir Iain Chalmers and Paul Glasziou.

The full text of the 2nd edition is available for free download, and the paperback and ebook editions can be purchased from the publisher or from online booksellers. The text is already available in some other languages, and translations into additional languages are being prepared.

Sources:

How much Monitoring is too Much?

Hilda Bastian is cartoonist and writer at StatisticallyFunny blog

Over-diagnosis #cartoon by @HildaBast on Flickr

” … many people – including many doctors – just love gadgets and measuring things… … Actually, there’s too much monitoring in some health matters. Some monitoring could cause anxiety without benefit, or lead to actions that do more harm than good. “

Hilda Bastian is Editor etc at PubMed Health, blogger at Scientific American. Commenting on epidemiology with cartoons at Statistically funny.

Read Every move you make….Are you watching you? and “Every Breath You Take, Every Move You Make…” How Much Monitoring Is Too Much? by Hilda Bastian.

See more comics – all our posts tagged overdiagnosis and screening

On Flickr®

Watch the Diaporama, and the health comics set on  DES Diethylstilbestrol's photostream on Flickr

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Email your photos to des.daughter@gmail.com with a short description and title :-)

There was NO Benefit with the Use of Diethylstilbestrol in preventing Miscarriages

More the opposite: DES-exposure in utero led to increased rate of miscarriage and preterm birth

Abstract

image of snake-oil-reps
Diethylstilbestrol usage is now obsolete in modern obstetrics practice. The review is historical to buttress the need for adequate and rigorous research into the use of drugs in pregnancy and ensure that they do more good than harm before being introduced for consumption.

Oestrogen supplementation, mainly diethylstilbestrol, for preventing miscarriages and other adverse pregnancy outcomes

BACKGROUND:
Laboratory evidence in the 1940s demonstrated a positive role of placental hormones in the continuation of pregnancy. It was suggested that diethylstilbestrol (DES) was the oestrogen of choice for prevention of miscarriages. Observational studies were carried out with apparently positive results, on which clinical practice was based. This led to a worldwide usage of diethylstilbestrol despite controlled studies with contrary findings.

OBJECTIVES:
To determine the effects of antenatal administration of oestrogens, mainly diethylstilbestrol, on high risk and unselected pregnancy as regards miscarriages and other outcomes.

SEARCH STRATEGY:
We searched the Pregnancy and Childbirth Group Specialised Register of controlled trials in November 2002.

SELECTION CRITERIA:
Randomised and quasi-randomised trials were included.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:
Both reviewers extracted data from the studies identified that met the selection criteria, and the data were analysed using the RevMan software.

MAIN RESULTS:
Miscarriage, preterm labour, low birthweight and stillbirth or neonatal death were not positively influenced by the intervention (diethylstilbestrol) as compared to the control group. Diethylstilbestrol in utero exposure led to increased rate of miscarriage and preterm birth. There was also an increase in the numbers of babies weighing less than 2500 grams. The maternal outcome in terms of pre-eclampsia was not influenced. Exposed female offsprings have a non-significant trend towards more cancer of the genital tract and cancer other than of the genital tract. Primary infertility, adenosis of the vagina/cervix in female offsprings, and testicular abnormality in male offsprings were significantly higher in those exposed to diethylstilbestrol before birth.

REVIEWER’S CONCLUSIONS:
There was no benefit with the use of diethylstilbestrol in preventing miscarriages. Both short and long-term adverse outcomes in exposed offsprings were demonstration of the harm that this intervention caused women and their offspring during its usage.

Sources
  • NCBI, Oestrogen supplementation, mainly diethylstilbestrol, for preventing miscarriages and other adverse pregnancy outcomes, PMID: 12918007, 2003;(3):CD004353.
  • The Cochrane Library, Full Article, DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004353, 21 JUL 2003 – PDF
More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

HealthApps – Check out Seven Phone Apps that could benefit your Health

While there may be some phone apps you can live without, there are some that can keep you healthy ! Check out seven apps that could benefit your health

When it comes to your phone, do you suffer from app overload? While there may be some  phone apps you can live without, there are some that can keep you healthy! Check out seven apps that could benefit your health.

More info and Videos

Yes! desPLEX to prevent Abortion Miscarriage and Premature Labor…

A convincing sales pitch appeared in 1957, right in the middle of the thirty-three year period between 1938 and 1971 during which Diethylstilbestrol (DES) was prescribed regularly under various brand names

image of desplex advert
Although clinical trials in the 1950s demonstrated that it was ineffective for prevention of adverse pregnancy outcomes, it remained in use until 1971 in the United States and until the early 1980s in some other countries. There was no benefit with the use of diethylstilbestrol in preventing miscarriages. Both short and long-term adverse outcomes in exposed offsprings were demonstration of the harm that this intervention caused women and their offspring during its usage.

Yes! desPLEX to prevent abortion miscarriage and premature labor. Recommended for routine prophylaxis in ALL pregnancies! Ninety-six percent live delivery with desPLEX in one series of 1200 patients – bigger and stronger babies, too. No gastric or other side effects with desPLEX – in either high or low dosage.”

This convincing sales pitch appeared in 1957, right in the middle of the thirty-three year period between 1938 and 1971 during which Diethylstilbestrol (DES) was prescribed regularly under the brand names Estrosyn, Palestrol, Domestrol, and more.

Sources
On Flickr®
More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Go Blue from April 2 to help raise Awareness and Funds to support Queenslanders living with ASD

If April doesn’t suit, please choose a more suitable day and make that your Go Blue for Autism day!

GO BLUE FOR AUTISM
Go Blue from April 2 to help raise awareness and funds to support Queenslanders living with ASD.

Each year on April 2, World Autism Awareness Day, iconic buildings across Australia and the world turn their lights blue to promote autism awareness. In support of this global initiative, Autism Queensland asks people Go Blue for the month of April to help raise awareness and funds to help us support Queenslanders of all ages living with ASD and their families.

Find more information, and/or contact enquiries@autismqld.com.au or call (07) 3273 0000.
Register online, get updates via Facebook and Twitter.