About One-Third of People with Autism also have Epilepsy

The connection between Autism and Epilepsy

Epilepsy in young adults with autism: a prospective population-based follow-up study of 120 individuals diagnosed in childhood

Abstract

Jasper's Basic Mechanisms of the Epilepsies
The Connection between Autism And Epilepsy

PURPOSE:
Little is known about the long-term outcome of epilepsy in autism and the epilepsy characteristics of adults with autism. This prospective population-based study was conducted in an attempt to point out differences on a group basis between adults with autism with or without epilepsy, and to describe the occurrence, the seizure characteristics, and the outcome of epilepsy in autism.

METHODS:
One hundred eight of 120 individuals with autism diagnosed in childhood and followed up prospectively for a period of 13-22 years were reevaluated at ages 17-40 years. As adults, the majority had mental retardation and autistic disorder or autistic-like condition. Interviews were performed with the caretakers of 42 of 43 individuals with a history of epilepsy, and their medical records were reviewed.

RESULTS:
Adults with autism and mental retardation constituted a severely disabled group. On a group basis, both the cognitive level and the adaptive behavior level were lower in the epilepsy group than in the nonepilepsy group (p<0.05). In all, 38% had epilepsy. One third had epilepsy onset before age 2 years. Remission of epilepsy was seen in 16%. Partial seizures with or without secondarily generalized seizures were the dominating seizure type.

CONCLUSIONS:
In a community sample of individuals with autism followed up from childhood through to adult age, one of three had epilepsy since childhood/adolescence. Severe mental retardation and autism are significantly associated with epilepsy, especially in female patients. Seizure frequency has a great impact on the individuals’ lives. Specialist medical care is needed in this severely communication-disabled population.

Pathophysiology of Epilepsy in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Excerpt

Epilepsy occurs frequently in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, the mechanisms responsible for increased seizure susceptibility in ASD are largely unknown. Clues to neural hyperexcitability in the autistic brain might be derived from disorders in which single gene mutations cause both epilepsy and an autistic phenotype, such as fragile X syndrome and tuberous sclerosis complex. This chapter summarizes current understanding of epilepsy in individuals with ASD and explores potential links between the genetic disruption of neural circuits and cellular signaling pathways that contribute to both epilepsy and ASD.

Sources and Press Release
  • The Connection Between Autism And Epilepsy, LiveScience, 45951-autism-epilepsy-connection by Dr. Megdad Zaatreh,
    May 29, 2014.
  • Pathophysiology of Epilepsy in Autism Spectrum Disorders, NCBI, PMID: 22787637, National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 2012. Full text NBK98169.
  • Epilepsy in young adults with autism: a prospective population-based follow-up study of 120 individuals diagnosed in childhood, NCBI, PMID: 15946331, Epilepsia. 2005 Jun;46(6):918-23.
    Full text PDF.

Author: DES Daughter

Activist, blogger and social media addict committed to shedding light on a global health scandal and dedicated to raise DES awareness.

6 thoughts on “About One-Third of People with Autism also have Epilepsy”

  1. Very interesting findings. As the mom of an adult child with ASD, surprisingly, I never heard of this connection. The one connection I know of first hand is the connection of ASD and some kind of digestive disorder , anything from acid reflux to IBD. Unfortunately my son has IBD, Ulcerative Colitus to be exact. We were told that 75%of people with ASD / autism had a digestive complication. They are just at the beginning stages of finding the connection. My son was diagnosed at 6 years of age. Tomorrow he is having his large I testing removed completely because he may have colon cancer. Very common with IBD patients. Going to be a long and difficult day tomorrow but I know in my sole he will be fine. Would love to know if anyone else is in my situation. Oh, and I’m DES!
    Dianne.

  2. Reblogged this on Ace News Desk 2014 and commented:
    #AND2014 – Added this to spread the word also added your news feed to our new RSS Feed Platform to share on our Social Network. hope that helps Ian 🙂
    Ian

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