What Chemicals lurk in UK Bread? More than you might expect…

Nearly two-thirds of the bread you eat contains pesticides residues

Nearly two-thirds of the bread you eat contains pesticides residues

PAN UK logo
Pesticide Action Network UK. Working to eliminate the dangers of toxic pesticides, our exposure to them and their presence in the environment.

A report released today by PAN UK in conjunction with the Organic. Naturally Different campaign, reveals that:

  • Nearly two-thirds (61.5%) of bread products tested by the UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs between 2000 and 2013, were contaminated with pesticides residues.
  • Figure has more than doubled over the last 12 years, rising from 28% in 2001 to 63% in 2013.
  • 17% of the samples contained traces of more than one pesticide.
  • Glyphosate – a herbicide that is increasingly linked to a variety of health issues – is the residue most often found in bread.

Sources and More Information:

  • Pesticides in Your Daily Bread: A consumer guide to pesticides in bread 2014, PAN UK, guide final, 17 July 2014
  • Nearly two-thirds of the bread you eat contains pesticides residues, PAN UK, news, 17 July 2014
  • What chemicals are lurking in your loaf? Nearly two thirds of bread products found to contain pesticide residues, DailyMail, news/article-2695224, 17 July 2014

Toxins in Your Office, in the Air

The Air You Breathe – The Impact of a Toxic Office

The Air You Breathe

The Air You Breathe infographic
Watch our selection of infographics addressing health issues on Flickr.
An image courteasy of @timetocleanse.

If you are anything like the average full-time office worker you’ll spend 1700 hours or more at work this year, most of it sitting at your desk.
If that’s not a sobering thought by itself, the following information might be! There’s a good chance your ‘clean, safe’ office environment contains a cocktail of toxins, germs and other nasties which could be making your sick, without you even knowing they are there. If you thought your toxic colleagues were the only kind of toxins you encounter at work, it might be time to think again…

Sources:

TimeToCleanse toxic office blog.
Find them also on Facebook and Twitter.

Find all our posts tagged infographics and safer chemicals.

On Flickr®

Dr Mercola Video Interview of Alain Cassels about Mammography Medical Screening

Does Medical Screening Turn Healthy People into Patients?

Natural health physician Dr. Joseph Mercola interviews Alan Cassels, a drug policy researcher at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, about medical screening.

More information

EDCs : Prostate Cancer in Young Men is More Frequent and More Aggressive

Early onset prostate cancer is a newly identified, more aggressive subtype often linked to genetic mutations

” The number of younger men diagnosed with prostate cancer has increased nearly 6-fold in the last 20 years, and the disease is more likely to be aggressive in these younger men. The new analysis, found that men with early onset prostate cancer had more genetic variants than men diagnosed with prostate cancer at a later age. ”

Abstract:

Nature News&Comment logo
Early onset prostate cancer is a newly identified, more aggressive subtype often linked to genetic mutations.

Prostate cancer is considered a disease of older men (aged >65 years), but today over 10% of new diagnoses in the USA occur in young men aged ≤55 years. Early-onset prostate cancer, that is prostate cancer diagnosed at age ≤55 years, differs from prostate cancer diagnosed at an older age in several ways. Firstly, among men with high-grade and advanced-stage prostate cancer, those diagnosed at a young age have a higher cause-specific mortality than men diagnosed at an older age, except those over age 80 years. This finding suggests that important biological differences exist between early-onset prostate cancer and late-onset disease. Secondly, early-onset prostate cancer has a strong genetic component, which indicates that young men with prostate cancer could benefit from evaluation of genetic risk. Furthermore, although the majority of men with early-onset prostate cancer are diagnosed with low-risk disease, the extended life expectancy of these patients exposes them to long-term effects of treatment-related morbidities and to long-term risk of disease progression leading to death from prostate cancer. For these reasons, patients with early-onset prostate cancer pose unique challenges, as well as opportunities, for both research and clinical communities. Current data suggest that early-onset prostate cancer is a distinct phenotype—from both an aetiological and clinical perspective—that deserves further attention.

Sources:
  • Prostate cancer in young men – more frequent and more aggressive?, NCCN, news/archive, 07/15/2014.
  • Prostate cancer in young men: an important clinical entity, Nature Reviews Urology, 11, 317–323 (2014) doi:10.1038/nrurol.2014.91, 13 May 2014.

 

Toxins in Your Office via Computers

Sick Workers – The Impact of a Toxic Office

Chemical Overload in Computers

Toxins in Your Office via Computers infographic
Watch our selection of infographics addressing health issues on Flickr.
An image courteasy of @timetocleanse.

If you are anything like the average full-time office worker you’ll spend 1700 hours or more at work this year, most of it sitting at your desk.
If that’s not a sobering thought by itself, the following information might be! There’s a good chance your ‘clean, safe’ office environment contains a cocktail of toxins, germs and other nasties which could be making your sick, without you even knowing they are there. If you thought your toxic colleagues were the only kind of toxins you encounter at work, it might be time to think again…

Sources:

TimeToCleanse toxic office blog.
Find them also on Facebook and Twitter.

Find all our posts tagged infographics and safer chemicals.

On Flickr®

Dysplasia and Cytologic Findings in 4589 Young Women enrolled in DiEthylStilbestrol-Adenosis Project

DiEthylStilbestrol usage review buttress the need for adequate and rigorous research into the use of drugs in pregnancy and ensure that they do more good than harm before being introduced

Abstract

image of PubMed NCBI The Endocrine Society logo
DiEthylStilbestrol usage review buttress the need for adequate and rigorous research into the use of drugs in pregnancy and ensure that they do more good than harm before being introduced.

This report presents the cytologic findings and the rates of dysplasia for 4,589 young women enrolled in the National Cooperative Diethylstilbestrol-Adenosis (DESAD) Project. Mucinous columnar cells and/or metaplastic squamous cells with or without mucinous droplets were encountered in 22% of vaginal scrape smears from all diethylstilbestrol (DES)-exposed participants identified by review of prenatal records and in 43% of women in whom vaginal epithelial changes (VEC) were observed by colposcopy or by iodine staining. The frequency of cellular findings in the vaginal scrape smears was closely related to the timing of the administration of the DES to the mother. With increasing age of the daughters, the overall frequencies of both the mucinous and metaplastic cells decreased; relative to each other, an increasing proportion was metaplastic squamous cells. These data suggest that, as the women grow older, vaginal adenosis regresses by the process of squamous metaplasia. Endometrial type cells were found in 2% of vaginal scrape smears. Their cyclical occurrence during the menstrual cycle and lack of correlation with the presence of VEC indicated an origin from the uterine corpus rather than the tuboendometrial type of adenosis. Squamous cell dysplasia of the vagina and cervix was detected by biopsy or scrape smear specimens in 1.8% of DES-exposed women in the record review group. The rate of unexposed women was twice as high. In general, the rates of dysplasia were higher in the cervix than vagina, and the more severe degrees of dysplasia were encountered only in those women who were referred to the DESAD Project or who themselves requested entry. Four patients who were referred or who themselves requested entry were found to have clear cell adenocarcinoma of the vagina. The vaginal smear provided the first clue to the presence of an abnormality in three of them.

Sources

  • Dysplasia and cytologic findings in 4,589 young women enrolled in diethylstilbestrol-adenosis (DESAD) project, NCBI, PMID: 7195652, Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1981 Jul 1;140(5):579-86.
More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Progesterone-releasing IUD associated with a Higher than expected Incidence of Breast Cancer

Cancer Risk in Women Using the Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System in Finland

Finnish researchers found that certain forms of IUD may actually put women at higher risk for breast cancer. The Hyvinkää Hospital study looked at the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) – or progesterone-releasing IUD – used as a contraceptive and also to treat women who suffer from heavy periods, endometriosis, and chronic pelvic pain.

Cancer Risk in Women Using the Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System in Finland

Abstract

Obstetrics & Gynecology logo
Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system use was associated with a higher than expected incidence of breast cancer.

OBJECTIVE:
To examine the association between premenopausal use of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system and cancer incidence in Finland with a special focus on endometrial adenocarcinoma.

METHODS:
All Finnish women aged 30-49 years using a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system for treatment of menorrhagia in 1994-2007 (n=93,843) were identified from the National Reimbursement Registry and linked to the Finnish Cancer Registry data. The incidence of cancers in levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system users was compared with that in the general population.

RESULTS:
A total of 2,781 cancer cases were detected in levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system users during the follow-up of 855,324 women-years. The standardized incidence ratio (observed-to-expected ratio) for endometrial adenocarcinoma was 0.50 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.35-0.70; 34 observed compared with 68 expected cases) after the first levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system purchase and 0.25 (95% CI 0.05-0.73; three observed compared with 12 expected cases) after two purchases. The standardized incidence ratio for ovarian cancer was 0.60 (95% CI 0.45-0.76; 59 observed compared with 99 expected cases), for pancreatic cancer 0.50 (95% CI 0.28-0.81; 15 observed compared with 30 expected cases), and for lung cancer 0.68 (95% CI 0.49-0.91; 43 observed compared with 63 expected cases). The standardized incidence ratio for breast cancer among all levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system users was 1.19 (95% CI 1.13-1.25; 1,542 observed compared with 1,292 expected cases).

CONCLUSION:
The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system may have a protective effect against endometrial malignant transformation. Using the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system for treatment of menorrhagia during reproductive years was associated with a lower incidence of endometrial, ovarian, pancreatic, and lung cancers than expected. Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system use was associated with a higher than expected incidence of breast cancer.

Sources:
  • Cancer Risk in Women Using the Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System in Finland,
    NCBI, PMID: 25004338, Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jul 7
  • IUD may carry higher risk for breast cancer in certain women,
    CNN, July 9, 2014
  • Breast Cancer Risk for Women Increases With IUD Study Suggests,
    GuardianLV, July 10, 2014

Toxins in Your Office and Sick Workers

The Impact of a Toxic Office
An Infographic by Time To Cleanse

sick workers infographic
Watch our selection of infographics addressing health issues on Flickr.
An image courteasy of @timetocleanse.

If you are anything like the average full-time office worker you’ll spend 1700 hours or more at work this year, most of it sitting at your desk.
If that’s not a sobering thought by itself, the following information might be! There’s a good chance your ‘clean, safe’ office environment contains a cocktail of toxins, germs and other nasties which could be making your sick, without you even knowing they are there. If you thought your toxic colleagues were the only kind of toxins you encounter at work, it might be time to think again…

Sources:

TimeToCleanse toxic office blog.
Find them also on Facebook and Twitter.

Find all our posts tagged infographics and safer chemicals.

On Flickr®

Probiotics may save Cancer Patients from deadly Chemotherapy and damaging Antibiotics

Induction of intestinal stem cells by R-spondin 1 and Slit2 augments chemoradioprotection

Treating a cancerous tumor is like watering a houseplant with a fire hose – too much water kills the plant, just as too much chemotherapy and radiation kills the patient before it kills the tumor. However, if the patient’s gastrointestinal tract remains healthy and functioning, the patient’s chances of survival increase exponentially… ”

Abstract

NCBI Logo
Cancer breakthrough : Probiotics may save patients from deadly chemotherapy ; antibiotics may cause chemo to be fatal

Cancer research has been righteously and successfully focused on prevention, early detection and identification of specific molecular targets that distinguish the malignant cells from the neighboring benign cells1. However, a major clinical challenge concerns how we can reduce lethal tissue injury caused by intensive chemoradiotherapy during treatment of late-staged metastatic cancers. Here we tested whether induction of adult stem cells repairs chemoradiation-induced tissue injury and prolongs overall survival. We found that intestinal stem cells (ISCs)2 expressed Slit2 and its single-span transmembrane cell-surface receptor Roundabout 1 (Robo1)3,4. Partial genetic deletion of Robo1 decreased intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and caused villus hypotrophy, whereas Slit2 transgene increased ISCs and triggered villus hypertrophy. During lethal dosages of chemoradiation, administering a short pulse of R-spondin 1 (Rspo1; a Wnt agonist)5–14 plus Slit2 reduced ISC loss, mitigated gut impairment and protected animals from death, without concomitantly decreasing tumor sensitivity to chemotherapy. Rspo1 and Slit2 may thus act as therapeutic adjuvants to enhance host tolerance to aggressive chemoradiotherapy for eradicating metastatic cancers.

Sources:
  • Induction of intestinal stem cells by R-spondin 1 and Slit2 augments chemoradioprotection, NCBI, PMCID: PMC3888063, NIHMSID: NIHMS498272, Jul 31, 2013. doi: 10.1038/nature12416
  • Cancer breakthrough: Probiotics may save patients from deadly chemotherapy; antibiotics may cause chemo to be fatal, NaturalNews, 041449, August 01, 2013
  • Gut reaction: Mice survive lethal doses of chemotherapy, MichiganNews, 21613, Jul 31, 2013

FDA proposes Social Media Guidelines for Drug and Medical Device Industry

FDA Issues Draft Guidances for Industry on Social Media and Internet Communications About Medical Products: Designed with Patients in Mind

The BMJ logo
The U.S. FDA issued proposed guidelines for the pharmaceutical and medical device industries for posting information on social media networks and correcting misinformation posted by others.

The US Food and Drug Administration has issued a first guidance for drug and medical device companies to use when posting information about products on internet platforms with strict limits on the number of characters allowed.

Such platforms would include the microblogging site Twitter, which limits posts to 140 characters, and the sponsored links that appear with Google and Yahoo search results.

In the case of drugs, for example, the FDA said that such posts should include the brand and chemical name of the drug, and, if the post makes a claim of benefit, must also present the drug’s most serious risks.

The presentation of risks and benefits should be balanced and should be included in the same message, the FDA said. For example, a 134 character “tweet” on Twitter for a hypothetical memory loss drug called “rememberine hydrochloride,” marketed under the brand name “NoFocus,” might read: “NoFocus (rememberine HCl) for mild to moderate memory loss—may cause seizures in patients with a seizure disorder www. nofocus.com/risk.”

The FDA said, “In the above example, benefit information for NoFocus is accurate and non-misleading, and the most serious risks associated with NoFocus are communicated together with the benefit information within the tweet.”

Sponsored links on Google allow for a URL of up to 35 characters, with an additional 70 characters of explanatory text. In addition to the main link the listing may have six additional links to related information, called “Sitelinks.” Each of these Sitelinks must be 25 characters maximum and may be accompanied by an additional 35 characters of text.

As an example of an appropriate sponsored link the FDA created “ouchafol,” a hypothetical drug for severe headaches associated with traumatic brain injury, marketed as “Headhurtz.” The package insert for this hypothetical drug included a boxed warning about potential brain swelling, as well as warnings about fatal drug reactions and life threatening drops in heart rate. In this case, the FDA said, the main sponsored link might read: “Headhurtz (ouchafol)” with the link www. headhurtz.com, accompanied by the text “For severe headache from traumatic brain injury.”

The main link would then have four related Sitelinks below it, each taking readers to web pages with risk information—in this case: a “Boxed Warning” link with the text “Potential for brain swelling,” a second “Warning” link with the text “Potentially fatal drug reaction,” another “Warning” link with the text “Life threatening drop in heart rate,” and a fourth “Risk information” link with the text “Important safety information.”

The FDA commented, “If a firm concludes that adequate benefit and risk information, as well as other required information, cannot all be communicated within the same character space limited communication, then the firm should reconsider using that platform for the intended promotional message.”

A second guidance document from the FDA2 provided advice to drug and device companies that voluntarily decide to correct misinformation posted about their products—positive or negative—by an independent third party who is not under the company’s control or influence. Such corrective communications, the FDA said, should address the misinformation but should be limited to the misinformation, be “non-promotional in nature, tone, and presentation,” consistent with FDA’s required labeling of the product, and disclose that the person providing the corrective information is affiliated with the firm.

“FDA does not expect firms to submit corrections to the agency when correcting misinformation pursuant to this draft guidance; however, FDA recommends that firms keep records to assist in responding to questions that may come from the agency,” the guidance said.

Both guidance documents are open for public comment for 90 days.

Sources:

  • US drug regulator proposes social media guidelines for drug and medical device industry, BMJ 2014;348:g4135, 19 June 2014
  • FDA Issues Draft Guidances for Industry on Social Media and Internet Communications About Medical Products: Designed with Patients in Mind, FDA Voice, June 17, 2014