Some new Birth Control Pills may boost Breast Cancer Risk

Recent Oral Contraceptive Use by Formulation and Breast Cancer Risk among Women 20 to 49 Years of Age

birth pills image
Women who recently used birth control pills containing high-dose estrogen and a few other formulations had an increased risk for breast cancer, Fred Hutch study finds. Image credit @ScienceDaily © areeya_ann / Fotolia.

Women who recently used birth control pills containing high-dose estrogen and a few other formulations had an increased risk for breast cancer, whereas women using some other formulations did not, according to data published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Our results suggest that use of contemporary oral contraceptives [birth control pills] in the past year is associated with an increased breast cancer risk relative to never or former oral contraceptive use, and that this risk may vary by oral contraceptive formulation ” said Elisabeth F. Beaber, PhD, MPH, a staff scientist in the Public Health Sciences Division of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington.

“ Our results require confirmation and should be interpreted cautiously,” added Beaber. “Breast cancer is rare among young women and there are numerous established health benefits associated with oral contraceptive use that must be considered. In addition, prior studies suggest that the increased risk associated with recent oral contraceptive use declines after stopping oral contraceptives. ”

In a nested case-control study of 1,102 women diagnosed with breast cancer and 21,952 controls, Beaber and colleagues found that recent oral contraceptive use increased breast cancer risk by 50 percent, compared with never or former use. All study participants were at Group Health Cooperative in the Seattle-Puget Sound area. Patients received a cancer diagnosis between 1990 and 2009.

Birth control pills containing high-dose estrogen increased breast cancer risk 2.7-fold, and those containing moderate-dose estrogen increased the risk 1.6-fold. Pills containing ethynodiol diacetate increased the risk 2.6-fold, and triphasic combination pills containing an average of 0.75 milligrams of norethindrone increased the risk 3.1-fold.

Birth control pills containing low-dose estrogen did not increase breast cancer risk.

About 24 percent, 78 percent, and less than 1 percent of study controls who were recent oral contraceptive users filled at least one prescription in the past year for low-, moderate-, and/or high-estrogen dose oral contraceptives, respectively, according to Beaber.

Unlike most previous studies that depended on women’s self-report or recall, which may cause bias, Beaber and colleagues used electronic pharmacy records to gather detailed information on oral contraceptive use including drug name, dosage, and duration of medication.

Sources and More Information
  • Recent Use of Some Birth Control Pills May Increase Breast Cancer Risk, AACR, ItemID=572, Aug. 1, 2014.
  • Some newer birth control pills may boost breast cancer risk, Fred Hutch study finds, Hutchinson Center, center-news, Aug. 1, 2014.
  • Recent Oral Contraceptive Use by Formulation and Breast Cancer Risk among Women 20 to 49 Years of Age, AACR, content/74/15/4078, May 24, 2014.

Author: DES Daughter

Activist, blogger and social media addict committed to shedding light on a global health scandal and dedicated to raise DES awareness.

2 thoughts on “Some new Birth Control Pills may boost Breast Cancer Risk”

  1. The headline isn’t correct. ISome “new” birth control pills increase risk.. In fact it is older high dose estrogen BC that is the problem according to other articles. Your risk also increases the more recently you have taken BC

    But most current BC is low dose.. The higher dose estrogen is however often used to treat break through bleeding during menopause

    1. Well cascadia, I am referring to a study announced here and the center doing the research used the word “newer” in their headline… did you see my sources at the bottom of the post?

      I agree there are articles which contradict each other on many topics in the health industry…
      Many thanks for your contribution

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