World Cancer Day 2015 Poster

For World Cancer Day 2015, the year theme is #NotBeyondUs

WCD15 poster
For World Cancer Day 2015, the year theme is #NotBeyondUs. Image via @uicc.
Watch @DES_Journal diaporama and health posters album on Flickr.

World Cancer Day takes place every year on 4 February and is the single initiative under which the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), its members, partners and the entire world can unite together in the fight against the global cancer epidemic.

Under the tagline ‘Not beyond us’, World Cancer Day 2015 will take a positive and proactive approach to the fight against cancer, highlighting that solutions do exist across the continuum of cancer, and that they are within our reach. The campaign explores how we can implement what we already know in the areas of prevention, early detection, treatment and care, and in turn, open up to the exciting prospect that we can impact the global cancer burden – for the better.

World Cancer Day 2015 is articulated around four key areas of focus:

  • Choosing healthy lives
  • Delivering early detection
  • Achieving treatment for all
  • Maximising quality of life

Sources

On Flickr®

The 8th Annual Autism Spectrum Disorders Update

Connecting the Dots: Clinical Research for Autism. Making A difference for our Children

Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford is here to help parents find answers.
On April 18, 2015 the Stanford Autism Center at Packard Children’s Hospital presents its 8th Annual Autism Spectrum Disorders Update, an event that gives members of the community a chance to learn about new autism research and therapies.

Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford banner image
Jill Escher will be speaking on the exploding autism numbers at the Stanford Autism Conference in April. See you there?

Connecting the Dots: Clinical Research for Autism. Making A difference for our Children

  • REGISTRATION FEE: The registration fee is $125.00. The fee includes a continental breakfast, buffet lunch and speaker handouts.
  • REGISTER ONLINE
  • SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM
  • WHERE: McCaw Hall in the Francis C. Arrillaga Alumni Center. 326 Galvez Street, Stanford, California 94035.
  • Parking is free and located at Galvez Field on the corner of Galvez Street and Campus Drive East.
  • WHEN: April 18, 2015 from 8:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (Registration and continental breakfast begin at 7:30 am).
  • WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Parents, teachers, pediatricians, psychologists, caregivers, media and anyone with an interest in autism are invited to attend.
  • CONTACT: For further information, please contact the Stanford Autism Center at Packard Children’s Hospital at (650) 721-6327 or e-mail Maura Chatwell.
Sources and more information
  • I will be speaking on the exploding #autism numbers at the Stanford Autism Conference in April. See you there? Jill Escher.
  • The 8th Annual Autism Spectrum Disorders Update, stanford childrens.

HRT: short-term use of hormone replacement therapy linked to ovarian cancer risk increase

HRT increases ovarian cancer risk

HRT menopause treatment ‘doubles the risk of getting ovarian cancer’

HRT at menopause image
Women who undergo hormone replacement therapy (HRT) have a ‘significantly increased’ risk of developing ovarian cancer, according to a major new study.

Researchers from the University of Oxford analysed 52 previous studies involving 21,000 women found that even those who took it for less than five years raised the risk level, although it reduces once they had stopped.

The study, published in the Lancet medical journal, has led to calls for medical guidance on HRT to be updated given the “causal relationship” and the Medical and Healthcare Products Regulatory Authority (MHRA) said it would look at the findings.

The researchers said: ‘The increased risk may well be largely or wholly causal; if it is, women who use hormone therapy for five years from around age 50 have about one extra ovarian cancer per 1,000 users and, if its prognosis is typical, about one extra ovarian cancer death per 1,700 users.

‘The findings that ovarian cancer risk is greatest in current users of hormone therapy, falls after use ceases, and varies by tumour type, strongly suggest a causal relationship – ie: that among otherwise similar women, use of hormone therapy increases the probability of developing the two most common types of ovarian cancer, and hence ovarian cancer as a whole.

‘At present, the WHO, European, and US guidelines about hormone therapy do not mention ovarian cancer, and the UK guidelines – which are due to be revised – state only that risk may be increased with long-term use.

‘The definite risk of ovarian cancer that is observed even with less than five years of use starting at around age 50 is directly relevant to current patterns of hormone therapy use, and hence directly relevant to medical advice, personal choices, and the current efforts to revise UK and worldwide guidelines.’

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and the risk of ovarian cancer

MHRA logo
MHRA statement in response to the study in The Lancet on the use of HRT.by Dr Sarah Branch, deputy director of MHRA’s Vigilance and Risk Management of Medicines (VRMM) Division

” Our advice has always been that the lowest effective dose of HRT should be used for the shortest possible time.

‘We will evaluate the findings of this study and its implications for shorter term use and update product information as necessary.

‘Women on HRT should have regular health check-ups and their need to continue treatment should be reassessed at least annually. Any woman on HRT who has any questions should speak to her doctor who is best placed to advise.”

Sources and more information
  • Menopausal hormone use and ovarian cancer risk: individual participant meta-analysis of 52 epidemiological studies, the lancet, abstract and full study PDF, 12 February 2015.
  • Short-term use of hormone replacement therapy associated with increased ovarian cancer risk, eurekalert, 12 February 2015.
  • HRT ‘increases ovarian cancer risk‘, BBC News, 13 February 2015

Cancer and choosing healthy lives

For World Cancer Day 2015, the year theme is #NotBeyondUs

WCD15_Poster_HealthyLifeChoice
For World Cancer Day 2015, the year theme is #NotBeyondUs. Image via @uicc.
Watch @DES_Journal diaporama and health posters album on Flickr.

World Cancer Day takes place every year on 4 February and is the single initiative under which the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), its members, partners and the entire world can unite together in the fight against the global cancer epidemic.

Under the tagline ‘Not beyond us’, World Cancer Day 2015 will take a positive and proactive approach to the fight against cancer, highlighting that solutions do exist across the continuum of cancer, and that they are within our reach. The campaign explores how we can implement what we already know in the areas of prevention, early detection, treatment and care, and in turn, open up to the exciting prospect that we can impact the global cancer burden – for the better.

World Cancer Day 2015 is articulated around four key areas of focus:

  • Choosing healthy lives
  • Delivering early detection
  • Achieving treatment for all
  • Maximising quality of life

Sources

On Flickr®

The FDA, fraud and misconduct in scientific studies of medicine

The FDA seem to bury evidence of fraud in medical trials

In at least 57 clinical trials conducted from 1998 to 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration found evidence of falsification, problems with reporting side-effects, inadequate record-keeping, and more. But only three of the resulting 78 publications monitored in today’s report mentioned the misconduct uncovered during inspections. And no corrections, retractions, or other comments were added after publication. The author of today’s report blames “regulatory capture” for the lapse, or a type of corruption where a public agency protects the interests of the groups it’s meant to regulate rather than the interests of the public at large. ”

FDA building image
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) routinely fails to report evidence of fraud or misconduct when it inspects the way researchers conduct clinical trials, leaving the public unaware of which research is credible and which is not.

2015 Study Abstract

Importance
Every year, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) inspects several hundred clinical sites performing biomedical research on human participants and occasionally finds evidence of substantial departures from good clinical practice and research misconduct. However, the FDA has no systematic method of communicating these findings to the scientific community, leaving open the possibility that research misconduct detected by a government agency goes unremarked in the peer-reviewed literature.

Objectives
To identify published clinical trials in which an FDA inspection found significant evidence of objectionable conditions or practices, to describe violations, and to determine whether the violations are mentioned in the peer-reviewed literature.

Design and Setting
Cross-sectional analysis of publicly available documents, dated from January 1, 1998, to September 30, 2013, describing FDA inspections of clinical trial sites in which significant evidence of objectionable conditions or practices was found.

Main Outcomes and Measures For each inspection document that could be linked to a specific published clinical trial, the main measure was a yes/no determination of whether there was mention in the peer-reviewed literature of problems the FDA had identified.

Results
Fifty-seven published clinical trials were identified for which an FDA inspection of a trial site had found significant evidence of 1 or more of the following problems: falsification or submission of false information, 22 trials (39%); problems with adverse events reporting, 14 trials (25%); protocol violations, 42 trials (74%); inadequate or inaccurate recordkeeping, 35 trials (61%); failure to protect the safety of patients and/or issues with oversight or informed consent, 30 trials (53%); and violations not otherwise categorized, 20 trials (35%). Only 3 of the 78 publications (4%) that resulted from trials in which the FDA found significant violations mentioned the objectionable conditions or practices found during the inspection. No corrections, retractions, expressions of concern, or other comments acknowledging the key issues identified by the inspection were subsequently published.

Conclusions and Relevance
When the FDA finds significant departures from good clinical practice, those findings are seldom reflected in the peer-reviewed literature, even when there is evidence of data fabrication or other forms of research misconduct.

Sources and more information
  • Are Your Medications Safe?, slate, Feb. 9 2015.
  • Research Misconduct Identified by the US Food and Drug Administration Out of Sight, Out of Mind, Out of the Peer-Reviewed Literature, JAMA Intern Med. Published online, doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.7774, February 09, 2015.
  • The FDA doesn’t tell you when it finds scientific fraud, theverge, February 9, 2015.
  • FDA fails to report fraud in clinical trials – study, Reuters, February 10, 2015.

Lung Cancer Breathalyser, detecting Symptoms early

A breathalyser that can diagnose lung cancer will be used in two NHS hospitals this summer as part of a £1m clinical trial

In this video published on 24 Jan 2014 by HudUniRepository channel, researchers at the University of Huddersfield were working on a breathalyser device that will be able to detect very early signs of lung cancer making a cure much more likely. In this video, Dr Airley talks about the project and why it will be pharmacists who administer the test that has the potential to save hundreds of thousands of lives.

More information

Cancer and maximising quality of life

For World Cancer Day 2015, the year theme is #NotBeyondUs

WCD15_Poster_QualityOfLife
For World Cancer Day 2015, the year theme is #NotBeyondUs. Image via @uicc.
Watch @DES_Journal diaporama and health posters album on Flickr.

World Cancer Day takes place every year on 4 February and is the single initiative under which the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), its members, partners and the entire world can unite together in the fight against the global cancer epidemic.

Under the tagline ‘Not beyond us’, World Cancer Day 2015 will take a positive and proactive approach to the fight against cancer, highlighting that solutions do exist across the continuum of cancer, and that they are within our reach. The campaign explores how we can implement what we already know in the areas of prevention, early detection, treatment and care, and in turn, open up to the exciting prospect that we can impact the global cancer burden – for the better.

World Cancer Day 2015 is articulated around four key areas of focus:

  • Choosing healthy lives
  • Delivering early detection
  • Achieving treatment for all
  • Maximising quality of life

Sources

On Flickr®

The association between in utero cigarette smoke exposure and age at menopause

Prenatal exposure to maternal cigarette smoke may play a role in programming age at menopause

cigarette-and-pregancy image
In this cohort of participants predominantly exposed to diethylstilbestrol, results suggest that prenatal exposure to maternal cigarette smoke may play a role in programming age at menopause.

2008 Study Abstract

Menopause onset, on average, occurs earlier among women who smoke cigarettes than among women who do not smoke. Prenatal smoke exposure may also influence age at menopause through possible effects on follicle production in utero.

Smoking information was obtained from the mothers of 4,025 participants in the National Cooperative Diethylstilbestrol Adenosis (DESAD) Project, a US study begun in 1975 to examine the health effects of prenatal diethylstilbestrol exposure. Between 1994 and 2001, participants provided information on menopausal status. Cox proportional hazards modeling compared the probability of menopause among participants who were and were not prenatally exposed to maternal cigarette smoke.

Participants prenatally exposed to maternal cigarette smoke were more likely than those unexposed to be postmenopause (hazard ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 1.43). The association was present among only those participants who themselves had never smoked cigarettes (hazard ratio = 1.38, 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.74) and was absent among active smokers (hazard ratio = 1.03, 95% confidence interval: 0.81, 1.31).

In this cohort of participants predominantly exposed to Diethylstilbestrol (DES) , results suggest that prenatal exposure to maternal cigarette smoke may play a role in programming age at menopause. The possibility that active cigarette smoking modifies this effect is also suggested.

Sources
More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Médicaments sous influence

Documentaire 2015 avec Bernard Dalbergue et Michele Rivasi

Ancien du laboratoire Merck, Bernard Dalbergue décide, en 2011, de quitter son poste et avec lui un milieu sclérosé par les pratiques controversées et les mensonges. Il révèle ici les scandales dont il a été témoin : comment les laboratoires s’emploient à maquiller certaines études médicales, abusent des instances internationales et mettent en péril la santé de millions de personnes à travers le monde. Cette enquête décrypte, entre autres, les conditions de mise sur le marché international de quelques redoutables médicaments, consommés en masse, et confronte la logique financière des laboratoires au combat de savants et de victimes.

En savoir plus

Cancer and delivering early detection

For World Cancer Day 2015, the year theme is #NotBeyondUs

WCD15_Poster_EarlyDetection
For World Cancer Day 2015, the year theme is #NotBeyondUs. Image via @uicc.
Watch @DES_Journal diaporama and health posters album on Flickr.

World Cancer Day takes place every year on 4 February and is the single initiative under which the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), its members, partners and the entire world can unite together in the fight against the global cancer epidemic.

Under the tagline ‘Not beyond us’, World Cancer Day 2015 will take a positive and proactive approach to the fight against cancer, highlighting that solutions do exist across the continuum of cancer, and that they are within our reach. The campaign explores how we can implement what we already know in the areas of prevention, early detection, treatment and care, and in turn, open up to the exciting prospect that we can impact the global cancer burden – for the better.

World Cancer Day 2015 is articulated around four key areas of focus:

  • Choosing healthy lives
  • Delivering early detection
  • Achieving treatment for all
  • Maximising quality of life

Sources

On Flickr®