Epidemiology of vaginal adenosis and adenocarcinoma associated with exposure to stilbestrol in utero

US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, 1977

image of woman thinking
While the risk of developing adenocarcinoma appears to be very low, a majority of exposed females do have other abnormalities of the lower genital tract. Almost sad – m00by by M.E. Aguila.

1977 Study Abstract

Following the observation that maternal ingestion of diethylstilbestrol was associated with the development of adenocarcinoma of the vagina in young women, analysis of 170 cases of the disease, collected over a two-year period, was undertaken. Details of history of non-steroidal estrogenic intake during pregnancy, its dosage and duration of intake and prevalence of concomitant abnormalities of the vagina and cervix were recorded.

This analysis disclosed that dosage and duration of intake do not appear to be vital factors in contributing to the development of carcinoma. A controlled, prospective investigation of prenatal exposure to stilbestrol was also carried out. Vaginal and cervical abnormalities were common among 110 young women exposed to stilbestrol in utero. Biopsy-proved vaginal adenosis was present in 35% of the exposed population as compared with only 1% of the control subjects. Fibrous ridges of the vagina and cervix and failure of the vaginal mucosa and portions of the cervix to stain with iodine were also more frequently observed in the exposed population.

While the risk of developing adenocarcinoma appears to be very low, a majority of exposed females do have other abnormalities of the lower genital tract. While some investigators believe that adenosis is a premalignant lesion, at present there is no clear-cut evidence of transition from adenosis to adenocarcinoma.

Sources and more information
  • Epidemiology of vaginal adenosis and adenocarcinoma associated with exposure to stilbestrol in utero, Cancer. ;39(4 Suppl):1892-5., Poskanzer DC, Herbst AL., NCBI PMID: 856457, 1977 Apr.
  • Full study, Volume 39, Issue Supplement S4, PDF, Article first published online: 27 JUN 2006
More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Les perturbateurs endocriniens, notre santé, les lobbies de la chimie

Quand les lobbies intoxiquent Bruxelles et plus encore

Interview de Stephane Horel sur franceinter. Date de diffusion : 09/10/15.

En savoir plus
  • Les lobbies de la chimie sont hyperactifs à Bruxelles pour freiner la mise en place d’une réglementation restrictive sur l’usage des perturbateurs endocriniens.
    ET ils sont jusqu’ici victorieux !
    Résultat : infertilité masculine galopante – un couple sur sept a des difficultés à procréer -, cancers hormonaux-dépendants (du sein ou de la prostate) ; diabète et l’obésité.
  • Nos posts tagués perturbateurs endocriniens.

The Full Blood Moon 19th #FullMoonEngageMe #SocialMedia Event on #EmpireKred #SocialNetworking

Join us to “get bought”, connect, super charge your social networking!

Image of fullmoon engageme empirekred october 2015
Between Saturday the 24th and Wednesday the 28th of October 2015, join our free social media event taking place at each Full Moon – via #EmpireKred – and give a boost to your social networking!

The Full Blood Moon

The full moon that appears in October is usually called the Hunters Moon, so named as the preferred month to hunt summer-fattened deer and fox unable to hide in now bare fields. Particularly bright and long in the sky, giving hunters the opportunity to stalk prey at night, the full moon is also referred to as the full blood moon for obvious reasons. Probably because of the threat of winter looming close, October’s full moon is generally accorded with special honor, historically serving as an important feast day in both Western Europe and among many Native American tribes. Other names for this full moon include the Sanguine MoonTravel Moon and the Dying Grass Moon.

19th #FullMoonEngageMe Schedule

Our free event will start on Saturday the 24th of October 2015 at +/- 07:00 UTC and will last until Wednesday the 28th at +/- 24:00 in HERE.

Anything special or different since the 18th edition?

Yes! Empire Avenue became Empire.Kred including new domain and new look. If two years ago I said that we all had kred somewhere, Kred now says that the score was just the tip of the iceberg

I am new with this, what is this about?

Our 1st #FullMoonEngageMe event launched in May 2014… Grab a unique opportunity to super charge your social networking by meeting and connecting with top social media engagers on #EmpireKred and beyond. Time for some “serious buzz” and serious FUN!

Confused? Not yet on Empire.Kred?

See you soon 😉

How to Do a Breast Self-Exam

Breast Self Examination – with video demonstration

This 2009 video explains and demonstrates how to correctly do a breast self examination.

More info and videos
  • Self-exams have to be performed once a month in a certain day of the menstruation cycle.
  • According to the Johns Hopkins Medical Center: “Forty percent of diagnosed breast cancers are detected by women who feel a lump, so establishing a regular breast self-exam is very important”.

Should I Get a Mammogram?

Understanding the Harms and Benefits of Routine Breast Cancer Screening

Should-I-Have-A-Mammogram
Download and print a PDF – Understanding the Harms and Benefits of Routine Breast Cancer Screening.

The banner statement (…screening to prevent…) is also misguiding because a screening cannot prevent anything, but only detect.
In order to prevent breast cancer to happen, steps must be taken before a screening detects anything… or it’s another story…

BC Action brochure – ©2014 – provides information about routine screening mammography for women at average risk of breast cancer who do not have a significant family history of breast cancer, have not been diagnosed with breast cancer, and have no other known risk factors.

  • USES OF MAMMOGRAPHY
  • THE FALSE PROMISE OF EARLY DETECTION
  • RISK ASSESSMENT
  • UNDERSTANDING THE HARMS OF SCREENING MAMMOGRAPHY
  • WHAT CAN YOU DO?

Should I Get a Mammogram? Understanding the Harms and Benefits of Routine Breast Cancer Screening: download and print a PDF.

Related posts

Pink Ribbons, Inc.

Breast Cancer and the Politics of Philanthropy

Pink-Ribbon-Inc book cover image
Breast Cancer and the Politics of Philanthropy

In 2005, more than one million people participated in the Susan G. Komen Foundation’s Race for the Cure, the largest network of 5K runs in the world. Consumers thoughtfully choose products ranging from yogurt to cars, responding to the promise that these purchases will contribute to a cure for the disease. And hundreds of companies and organizations support Breast Cancer Awareness Month, founded by a pharmaceutical company in 1985 and now recognized annually by the president of the United States.

What could be wrong with that? In Pink Ribbons, Inc., Samantha King traces how breast cancer has been transformed from a stigmatized disease and individual tragedy to a market-driven industry of survivorship. In an unprecedented outpouring of philanthropy, corporations turn their formidable promotion machines on the curing of the disease while dwarfing public health prevention efforts and stifling the calls for investigation into why and how breast cancer affects such a vast number of people. Here, for the first time, King questions the effectiveness and legitimacy of privately funded efforts to stop the epidemic among American women. Pink Ribbons, Inc. grapples with issues of gender and race in breast cancer campaigns of businesses such as the National Football League; recounts the legislative history behind the breast cancer awareness postage stamp—the first stamp in American history to raise funds for use outside the U.S. Postal Service; and reveals the cultural impact of activity-based fund-raising, such as the Race for the Cure. Throughout, King probes the profound implications of consumer-oriented philanthropy on how patients experience breast cancer, the research of the biomedical community, and the political and medical institutions that the breast cancer movement seeks to change.

Highly revelatory—at times shocking—Pink Ribbons, Inc. challenges the commercialization of the breast cancer movement, its place in U.S. culture, and its influence on ideas of good citizenship, responsible consumption, and generosity. Samantha King is associate professor of physical and health education and women’s studies at Queen’s University, in Kingston, Ontario.

More information

Primary Vaginal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of Intestinal Type in a DES-Exposed Woman

American journal of clinical pathology, 2015

Intestinal-metaplasia
Recognition of primary vaginal mucinous adenocarcinoma of intestinal type, extremely rare malignancy, is important, particularly to avoid the pitfall of misdiagnosing metastatic disease.

2015 Study Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
Primary mucinous vaginal adenocarcinoma of intestinal type is an extremely rare malignancy of uncertain histogenesis, which makes for a diagnostic challenge. We report a case and describe the histopathologic features and the unusual immunoprofile of this rare entity.

METHODS:
We report a case of vaginal mucinous adenocarcinoma of intestinal type in a diethylstilbestrol-exposed woman in which intestinal metaplasia of the Skene duct was found at the time of recurrence.

RESULTS:
As the histogenesis of primary vaginal intestinaltype adenocarcinomas remains uncertain, the finding of Skene duct metaplasia in association with invasive adenocarcinoma lends support to the origin of vaginal mucinous adenocarcinomas of intestinal type to be metaplasia, at least in some cases. Such an origin accounts for the unusual immunohistochemical profile, which raises concern for a metastatic adenocarcinoma of gastrointestinal origin.

CONCLUSIONS:
Recognition of this rare entity is important, particularly to avoid the pitfall of misdiagnosing metastatic disease.

Sources and more information
  • Primary Vaginal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of Intestinal Type, Associated With Intestinal Metaplasia of Skene Ducts in a Diethylstilbestrol-Exposed Woman, American journal of clinical pathology, 2015 Nov;144(5):790-5. doi: 10.1309/AJCPVZ0QNLUO7OFE., NCBI PMID: 26486744.
More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Breast Cancer Screening for Women at Average Risk – 2015 Guidelines

American Cancer Society, in a Shift, Recommends Fewer Mammograms

Despite the substantial interest and investment in research on breast cancer screening, there is uncertainty about the magnitude of mammography’s benefits and harms and how to select patients and screening strategies to optimize the balance between benefits and harms.
Despite the substantial interest and investment in research on breast cancer screening, there is uncertainty about the magnitude of mammography’s benefits and harms and how to select patients and screening strategies to optimize the balance between benefits and harms. The American Cancer Society, which has for years taken the most aggressive approach to screening, issued new guidelines, recommending that women should begin mammograms later and have them less frequently than it had long advocated.
Breast Cancer Awareness, A Touch Of Pink by bellasdolls.

2015 Study Abstract

Importance
Breast cancer is a leading cause of premature mortality among US women. Early detection has been shown to be associated with reduced breast cancer morbidity and mortality.

Objective
To update the American Cancer Society (ACS) 2003 breast cancer screening guideline for women at average risk for breast cancer.

Process
The ACS commissioned a systematic evidence review of the breast cancer screening literature to inform the update and a supplemental analysis of mammography registry data to address questions related to the screening interval. Formulation of recommendations was based on the quality of the evidence and judgment (incorporating values and preferences) about the balance of benefits and harms.

Evidence Synthesis
Screening mammography in women aged 40 to 69 years is associated with a reduction in breast cancer deaths across a range of study designs, and inferential evidence supports breast cancer screening for women 70 years and older who are in good health. Estimates of the cumulative lifetime risk of false-positive examination results are greater if screening begins at younger ages because of the greater number of mammograms, as well as the higher recall rate in younger women. The quality of the evidence for overdiagnosis is not sufficient to estimate a lifetime risk with confidence. Analysis examining the screening interval demonstrates more favorable tumor characteristics when premenopausal women are screened annually vs biennially. Evidence does not support routine clinical breast examination as a screening method for women at average risk.

Recommendations
The ACS recommends that women with an average risk of breast cancer should undergo regular screening mammography starting at age 45 years (strong recommendation). Women aged 45 to 54 years should be screened annually (qualified recommendation). Women 55 years and older should transition to biennial screening or have the opportunity to continue screening annually (qualified recommendation). Women should have the opportunity to begin annual screening between the ages of 40 and 44 years (qualified recommendation). Women should continue screening mammography as long as their overall health is good and they have a life expectancy of 10 years or longer (qualified recommendation). The ACS does not recommend clinical breast examination for breast cancer screening among average-risk women at any age (qualified recommendation).

Conclusions and Relevance
These updated ACS guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations for breast cancer screening for women at average risk of breast cancer. These recommendations should be considered by physicians and women in discussions about breast cancer screening.

Sources and more information – October 2015
  • Breast Cancer Screening for Women at Average Risk 2015 Guideline Update From the American Cancer Society, JAMA. articleid=2463262 2015;314(15):1599-1614. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.12783, October 20, 2015.
  • New Guidelines for Breast Cancer Screening in US Women, JAMA. articleid=2463237 2015;314(15):1569-1571. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.13086, October 20, 2015.
  • Benefits and Harms of Breast Cancer Screening A Systematic Review, JAMA. articleid=2463261 2015;314(15):1615-1634. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.13183, October 20, 2015.
  • Measuring the Effectiveness of Mammography, JAMA Oncol. articleid=2456189#ced150019r1 Published online October 20, 2015. doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2015.3286.
  • Breast Tumor Prognostic Characteristics and Biennial vs Annual Mammography, Age, and Menopausal Status, JAMA Oncol. articleid=2456190 Published online October 20, 2015. doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2015.3084, October 20, 2015.
  • American Cancer Society, in a Shift, Recommends Fewer Mammograms, nytimes, OCTOBER 20, 2015.

Top 5 Food Tips for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

We are what we eat – but that isn’t always a good thing

By reducing our exposure to toxic chemicals in our food, we reduce our risk of disease.

It’s time to #RethinkThePink, and stop breast cancer before it starts!

  1. Choose organic fruits and veggies – avoid pesticides
  2. If you eat meat, choose hormone-free
  3. Avoid canned foods
  4. Ditch Teflon® Pots and Pans
  5. Catch Some Non-toxic Seafood

Read #RethinkThe Pink: Top 5 Food Tips for Breast Cancer Awareness Month
by breastcancerfund, September 30, 2015.

More information

Gender Dysphoria, Transsexualism, and Disorders of Sexual Differentiation in DES Sons

DES Sons International Network slideshow presentation, 2004

by Scott P. Kerlin, Ph.D.

DES Sons International Network

The Presence of Gender Dysphoria, Transsexualism, and Disorders of Sexual Differentiation in Males Prenatally Exposed to Diethylstilbestrol: Initial Evidence from a 5-Year Study.

Sources:

More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources