The management of DES-exposed women: one physician’s approach

It is clear that DES has long-term effects that may develop over time

The finding of an incidence of 47% of cervical or vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia in 34 patients aged 10 to 26 years so treated to date indicates a high risk of potential candidacy for squamous carcinoma of the vagina or cervix in later years. Away we try to escape by Kei Kojishi.

1976 Study Abstract

The female offspring of diethylstilbestrol DES-treated mothers are examined cytologically and colposcopically annually, starting at the age of seven years no treatment is indicated until a colposcopic atypical transformation zone occurs. With its occurrence all the abnormal epithelium (squamous or columnar) is excised from the vagina and cervix under colposcopic guidance in the hospital or in the office under local anesthesia. The procedures are done in stages to minimize scarring and to eliminate the possibility of vaginal-cervical adhesions or vaginal shortening. The finding of an incidence of 47% of cervical or vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia in 34 patients aged 10 to 26 years so treated to date indicates a high risk of potential candidacy for squamous carcinoma of the vagina or cervix in later years.

Sources and more information
  • The management of DES-exposed women: one physician’s approach, The Journal of reproductive medicine, NCBI pubmed 957347; 16(6):285-8. 1976 Jun.
More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Author: DES Daughter

Activist, blogger and social media addict committed to shedding light on a global health scandal and dedicated to raise DES awareness.

2 thoughts on “The management of DES-exposed women: one physician’s approach”

  1. in today’s world it is harder and harder to find a doctor with any experience with DES exposed people. i had a young GYN oncologist who, thankfully yet sadly, had three of us at the same time. She was able to explain to me prior to my hysterectomy just how she would have to operate, but even she couldn’t have known how much of my vagina would have to be taken to get the mal-formed cervix out during my total hysterectomy. and it was a very young PA who insisted i have an HPV test after i was widowed and found the aggressive strain, the cancerous cells were not seen due to the folded over and “smooshed” cervix from DES. a double whammy. i am thankful to these young women who had kept themselves aware of all the things a woman my age might have been exposed to, AND they read my file carefully enough to know about my DES past. we must remain our own best advocates.

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