Occurrence of tumours in the descendants of CBA male mice prenatally treated with diethylstilbestrol

Statistically significant increased incidence of tumours observed in females

DiEthylStilbestrol usage review buttress the need for adequate and rigorous research into the use of drugs in pregnancy and ensure that they do more good than harm before being introduced for consumption.

1992 Study Abstract

There is well documented evidence both in humans and in experimental animals that exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) during pregnancy results in an increased incidence of tumours in the progeny. The increased cancer risk has been reported to persist in the second generation descendants of DES-exposed pregnant mice. In the present experiment, female mice of the CBA strain were treated at day 17 of pregnancy with 1 microgram/g body weight of DES. The descendants of DES-treated mothers, described as F1DES, were mated among each other or with untreated animals. The F1DES females were found to be sterile when mated with either F1DES or untreated males. F1DES males were successfully mated with untreated females. In the female offspring so obtained, but not in the male, a statistically significant increased incidence of tumours was observed, in particular of uterine sarcomas, and also of benign ovarian tumours and of lymphomas.

Sources and more information
  • Occurrence of tumours in the descendants of CBA male mice prenatally treated with diethylstilbestrol, International journal of cancer, NCBI PMID: 1728603, 1992 Jan 2.
More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Author: DES Daughter

Activist, blogger and social media addict committed to shedding light on a global health scandal and dedicated to raise DES awareness.

2 thoughts on “Occurrence of tumours in the descendants of CBA male mice prenatally treated with diethylstilbestrol”

  1. I was born in 1970. I believe that this drug caused me to have Tatrology of Fallot(whole in heart) And in addition many other ones. Oh and lucky me just one year later it was pulled.

Have your say! Share your views

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s