A focus group study of DES daughters: implications for health care providers

DES-victims distrust of the medical profession, Psycho-oncology, 2000

image of doctors-and-DES
This 2000 study showed DES Daughters felt that physicians lacked information about the long-term health effects of DES exposure and as a result did not give them accurate information. Furthermore, they felt that physicians were dismissive of their concerns and often gave what they felt to be false reassurances.

2000 Study Abstract

A focus group study of women exposed to diethylstilbestrol (DES) in utero (DES daughters) was conducted to gain understanding about exposure to this drug from a patient perspective.

  • Focus group participants reported that learning about their DES exposure was devastating; they experienced
    • strains in their family relationships,
    • emotional shock,
    • a feeling that their health concerns were not appreciated by others
    • and, to some degree, a sense of social isolation.
  • Although many were aware of the need for special gynecological exams and high-risk prenatal care, they were frustrated by what they felt was a lack of reliable and clear information about the effects of DES exposure.
  • Most expressed questions and anxiety about their health.
  • Many found their communication with physicians about their DES exposure unsatisfying. They felt that physicians lacked information about the long-term health effects of DES exposure and as a result did not give them accurate information. Furthermore, they felt that physicians were dismissive of their concerns and often gave what they felt to be false reassurances. Consequently, the women developed an enduring distrust of the medical profession.

The results of the study suggest implications for the delivery of health care to DES daughters.

Sources and more information
  • A focus group study of DES daughters: implications for health care providers, Psycho-oncology, NCBI PMID: 11038482, 2000 Sep-Oct.
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ADHD sufferers now make up 12 percent of school-aged kids, with sharp rise in girls

ADHD diagnoses skyrocket among U.S. kids

adhd-girls
ADHD sufferers now make up 12 percent of school-aged kids, and two groups are growing quickly: girls and Hispanics.. The report, published in The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, suggests that 5.8 million children ages 5 to 17 in the U.S. are now diagnosed with the disorder, which is characterized by difficulty paying attention, hyperactivity, and impulsiveness. The report shows a surprising 55 percent increase in prevalence of diagnoses among girls — from 4.7 percent to 7.3 percent from 2003 to 2011. Producer’s Notes: Nature Deficit Disorder.

2015 Study Abstract

Background:
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed mental disorder among children in the United States. While overall ADHD prevalence continues to rise, few have examined difference by race/ethnicity.

Objective:
To examine trends in parent-reported ADHD prevalence between 2003 and 2011 across racial/ethnic groups and the role of sociodemographic factors in observed differences in ADHD.

Method:
Data were from 3 waves of the National Survey of Children’s Health (2003, 2007, and 2011), including 190,408 children aged 5–17 years. Independent variables included race/ethnicity (white non-Hispanic, black non-Hispanic, Hispanic, other non-Hispanic), gender, age, poverty level, primary language, insurance status, parental marital status, and neighborhood safety. Sociodemographic factors and year were compared among those diagnosed with ADHD and between racial/ethnic groups using χ2 tests. Adjusted logistic regression models, stratified by race/ethnicity, were fit to examine the association between identified risk factors and ADHD across racial/ethnic groups. Parental report of an ADD or ADHD diagnosis for a child aged 5–17 years was the dependent variable. If the household included more than 1 child aged 5–17 years, 1 was selected at random.

Results:
Increasing trends were observed over the past decade in the prevalence of parent-reported ADHD overall (43%, P < .001), among children aged 10–14 years (47%, P < .001), and adolescents aged 15–17 years (52%, P < .001). Although the ADHD prevalence was still highest among whites, increasing trends were observed for all racial/ethnic groups, most notably among Hispanics, increasing 83% from 2003 to 2011 (P < .001). A greater increase in ADHD was also observed among females (55%, P < .001) than among males (40%).

Conclusions:
Economics, family status, non-English language in the home, and neighborhood safety factors differentially impacted diagnosed ADHD across racial/ethnic groups. Although new insights into the role of economic, family, and neighborhood factors on parent-reported ADHD diagnoses were noted, more research is needed to understand causes of the observed racial/ethnic disparities.

Sources and more information
  • Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Parent-Reported Diagnosis of ADHD: National Survey of Children’s Health (2003, 2007, and 2011), The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 10.4088/JCP.14m09364, 2015.
  • ADHD diagnoses skyrocket among U.S. kids, CBS NEWS, December 8, 2015.
  • Sharp rise in ADHD diagnoses in girls challenges myth that the condition is mostly a boy thing, washingtonpost, December 9.
  • The ADHD Epidemic No One Is Talking About, thedailybeast, 12.09.15.

Five natural antibiotics that fight illness and promote health

There are many herbs and foods that can treat and prevent a wide variety of illnesses and diseases

Natural antibiotics can be powerful treatments for illnesses, preventing disease and keeping the body’s health in balance. Natural antibiotics, such as honey, ginger and Echinacea, among others, are powerful remedies to a wide variety of illnesses and diseases.

natural-antibiotics infographic
There are many herbs and foods that can treat and prevent a wide variety of illnesses and diseases.
Sources and more information

Prenatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol and the mother-daughter relationship

European journal of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive biology, 1996

mother-daughter-relationship image
Exposure to DES may reveal pre-existing difficulties not only between the mother and the daughter, but sometimes beyond from generation to generation.

1996 Study Abstract

The psychological consequences resulting from the exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES), a non-steroidal oestrogen, on the mother-daughter relationship are studied using semi-directive interviews with 43 daughters and 7 mothers treated with DES during their pregnancies. These women referred to gynaecological consultation for DES-related problems.

The daughters, exposed to DES during their foetal life, learned about DES after a pregnancy mishap (35% of the cases), or by accident (65% of the cases). All of them were shocked when the existence of DES and its side effects were revealed to them. Consequences on the mother-daughter relationship were absent in 60% of the cases, favourable in 20%, and negative in 20%. Five percent of the women showed hostility towards the medical practice, but 65% were not suspicious of the drugs administered to them during their pregnancies. For 64% of them, administration of DES to their mother had been kept secret. In 7 out of 50 cases, parents alone came for medical assistance in order to manage the secret.

Exposure to DES may reveal pre-existing difficulties not only between the mother and the daughter, but sometimes beyond from generation to generation.

Sources and more information
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High Exposure to Organophosphate Flame Retardants in Infants: Associations with Baby Products

Study finds flame retardant exposure higher in infants than adults

image of Flame-Retardants-in-Infants chart
A growing list of major retail stores have pledged to stop selling furniture containing flame retardants, which research suggests could cause developmental problems. Despite the trend, however, it could take years before widespread exposure declines. And now, a study in ACS’ journal Environmental Science & Technology has revealed more bad news: Infants could potentially be affected the most. The report also looks at potential exposure routes.

2015 Study Abstract

Infant products containing polyurethane foam are commonly treated with organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs), including tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TDCIPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP). Infants may have greater exposure due to greater contact with these products, yet little is known about levels of exposure or the factors contributing to higher exposure.

We recruited children age 2–18 months from North Carolina to investigate PFR exposure (n = 43; recruited 2014–2015). Parents provided information on potential sources and modifiers of exposure, and reported whether they owned common infant products.

We measured five PFR metabolites in urine samples collected from children. TDCIPP and TPHP metabolites (bis(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (BDCIPP) and diphenyl phosphate (DPHP)) were most commonly detected (>93% detect). Other metabolites were detected infrequently (<35% detect). Although we did not observe a clear age trend for infants, BDCIPP levels were substantially higher than those reported for adults (geometric mean = 7.3 ng/mL). The number of infant products owned was strongly associated with BDCIPP; children with >16 products had BDCIPP levels that were 6.8 times those with (<13). (p = 0.02). Infants attending daycare centers also had higher BDCIPP levels (3.7 times those of others; p = 0.07), suggesting time spent in this microenvironment contributes to higher exposure. In contrast, DPHP levels were not related to products owned, time in different microenvironments, or behavior.

Source and more information
  • Study finds flame retardant exposure higher in infants than adults, American Chemical Society, December 02, 2015.
  • High Exposure to Organophosphate Flame Retardants in Infants: Associations with Baby Products, American Chemical Society, DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.5b03577, November 9, 2015.

 

STILBOESTROL 1 mg Tablets by British Drug Houses Ltd

Diethylstilbestrol DES was sold under many names

image of a Stilboestrol-1-mg bottle
Diethylstilbestrol or DES was sold under many names. Image credit © Science Museum.

Diethylstilbestrol or DES was sold under many names including Distilbène®, Stilbetin®, Stilboestrol-Borne®, Benzestrol®, Chlorotrianisene®, Estrobene® and Estrosyn® to name just a few.

Many different companies manufactured and marketed this drug under more than 200 different brand names.

This glass bottle of Stilboestrol tablets 1 mg was manufactured by:
The British Drug Houses Ltd,
London, Greater London, England,
United Kingdom.

DES drugs pictures
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Vulnerability to stress among women with in utero diethylstilbestrol (DES) exposed daughters

DES mothers may manifest increased vulnerability to subsequent stresses in their lives

image of woman-and-stress
DES mothers may manifest increased vulnerability to subsequent stresses in their lives. Michael Clesle.

1985 Study Abstract

In utero exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) was initially linked to vaginal-cervical cancer and subsequently to reproductive difficulties. These unanticipated and ongoing health risks to female offspring may constitute a chronic source of stress for DES mothers.

We interviewed 60 mothers of exposed daughters and 30 acquaintance controls.
Two hypotheses were tested in regard to DES mothers:

  1. DES discovery and its aftermath have a direct, long-term, negative effect on psychological health
  2. and the DES experience intensifies the negative psychological effects of other adverse life circumstances.

To operationalize psychological health, we measured symptoms of “demoralization” and positive health practices–the latter as a behavioral indicator of mastery and personal control. We also measured adversities that may mediate the threat posed by DES, including stressful events, medical problems, and chronic burdens.

We found DES history to be associated with poorer psychological health only when mothers encountered other losses and threats to themselves and their families. We concluded that DES mothers may manifest increased vulnerability to subsequent stresses in their lives.

Sources and more information
  • Vulnerability to stress among women with in utero diethylstilbestrol (DES) exposed daughters, Journal of human stress, NCBI PMID: 3855173, 1985.
More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

If you want to eat chicken in the U.S., Salmonella is a risk you have to live with

Ten things to know before you eat your next chicken dinner

image of US-chickens
In the U.S., even chicken that has passed all federal food safety requirements still can make people sick. This proved true in 2013 after a massive salmonella outbreak linked to Foster Farms sickened hundreds of people in 29 states. Salmonella sickens about 1 million Americans a year, and chicken is a common source.
Gunthorp Farms chickens image credit Darren Hauck for Reveal.
  • It’s legal to sell raw chicken that has bacteria on it that could kill you
  • Salmonella is the rare foodborne pathogen that is both common and potentially deadly
  • Even when processing plants meet federal standards, they can be the source of massive outbreaks
  • There’s no requirement to test chickens for salmonella where it spreads – on the farm
  • Processing plants aren’t shut down when they’re cranking out contaminated birds
  • Efforts to reform the system have been opposed by the industry and failed
  • Avoiding industrial chicken by buying local isn’t necessarily safer
  • Raising backyard chickens won’t guarantee to protect you
  • Antibiotic-resistant strains of salmonella are on the rise
  • Other countries don’t stand for salmonella the way U.S. do

Read 10 things to know before you eat your next chicken dinner, revealnews, December 2, 2015.

The Birth of Big Pharma

Nearly half the U.S. population is now taking a daily dose of one or more pharmaceuticals

Birth_Big_Pharma cartoon
Dan Berger is cartoonist behind Natural News. Image via @HealthRanger.

It’s astounding: Nearly half the U.S. population is now taking a daily dose of one or more pharmaceuticals. The drug industry, which once merely hoped to medicate sick people, now has a more ambitious goal: medicate everyone, including people who aren’t sick.

Health cartoons
Related posts

Physical and psychological problems associated with exposure to diethylstilbestrol

Psychiatric disorders among DES-exposed persons, 1988

image of the-lightner
Psychiatric disorders among DES-exposed persons are reportedly twice as common as for nonexposed persons, with anger, anxiety, low self-worth, identity confusion, and guilt the most frequent symptoms. the lightner.

1988 Study Abstract

The synthetic hormone diethylstilbestrol (DES) was widely prescribed between 1943 and 1971 to minimize pregnancy complications.

It has caused serious physical and psychological damage to the women who took it and to their offspring. DES-exposed mothers may suffer a higher incidence of breast cancer, their exposed daughters are at risk for reproductive tract cancers and infertility, and their exposed sons are more likely to have genital abnormalities and reproductive dysfunction.

Psychiatric disorders among DES-exposed persons are reportedly twice as common as for nonexposed persons, with anger, anxiety, low self-worth, identity confusion, and guilt the most frequent symptoms. The author describes therapeutic interventions designed to alleviate these problems.

Sources and more information
  • Physical and psychological problems associated with exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES), Hospital & community psychiatry, NCBI PMID: 3276594, 1988 Jan.
  • Full study psychiatryonline, Volume 39 Issue 1, January 1988, pp. 73-77.
More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources