Do some clothing trap phthalates and flame retardants chemicals in their fibres?

How your washing machine could be damaging fertility

From Clothing to Laundry Water: Investigating the Fate of Phthalates, Brominated Flame Retardants, and Organophosphate
Esters, eurekalert, July 18, 2016. PDF.

The mystery of how some hormone-disrupting chemicals have come to be found in lakes and rivers has been solved.

It appears that human clothing can trap the chemicals in their fibres and come laundry day, they are released into water of the washing machine, before being swept away into the sewerage system.

ABSTRACT:

The accumulation of phthalate esters, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and organophosphate esters (OPEs) by clothing from indoor air and transfer via laundering to outdoors were investigated.

Over 30 days cotton and polyester fabrics accumulated 3475 and 1950 ng/dm2 ∑5phthalates, 65 and 78 ng/dm2 ∑10BFRs, and 1200 and 310 ng/dm2 ∑8OPEs, respectively. Planar surface area concentrations of OPEs and low molecular weight phthalates were significantly greater in cotton than polyester and similar for BFRs and high molecular weight phthalates. This difference was significantly and inversely correlated with KOW, suggesting greater sorption of polar compounds to polar cotton. Chemical release from cotton and polyester to laundry water was >80% of aliphatic OPEs (log KOW < 4), < 50% of OPEs with an aromatic structure, 50−100% of low molecular weight phthalates (log KOW 4−6), and < detection−35% of higher molecular weight phthalates (log KOW > 8) and BFRs (log KOW > 6).

How your washing machine could be damaging fertility, telegraph, 10 AUGUST 2016.

These results support the hypothesis that clothing acts an efficient conveyer of soluble semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from indoors to outdoors through accumulation from air and then release during laundering. Clothes drying could as well contribute to the release of chemicals emitted by electric dryers. The results also have implications for dermal exposure.

Author: DES Daughter

Activist, blogger and social media addict committed to shedding light on a global health scandal and dedicated to raise DES awareness.

Have your say! Share your views

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s