Emerging, priority contaminants with endocrine active potentials in sediments, fish from the River Po, Italy

High levels of endocrine-disrupting chemicals found in sediments and fish from the Italian River Po and its Lambro tributary

Researchers have recommended that fish from some sections of the River Po and the River Lambro, one of the Italian River Po tributaries, should not be eaten due to high levels of some endocrine-disrupting chemicals in the river sediments and fish. This recommendation is based on an extensive update regarding pollution levels of such substances in the rivers.

Abstract

There is a substantial lack of information on most priority pollutants, related contamination trends, and (eco)toxicological risks for the major Italian watercourse, the River Po. Targeting substances of various uses and origins, this study provides the first systematic data for the River Po on a wide set of priority and emerging chemicals, all characterized by endocrine-active potentials.

Flame retardants, natural and synthetic hormones, surfactants, personal care products, legacy pollutants, and other chemicals have been investigated in sediments from the River Po and its tributary, the River Lambro, as well as in four fish species from the final section of the main river. With few exceptions, all chemicals investigated could be tracked in the sediments of the main Italian river for tens or hundreds of kilometres downstream from the Lambro tributary.

Nevertheless, the results indicate that most of these contaminants, i.e., TBBPA, TCBPA, TBBPA-bis, DBDPE, HBCD, BPA, OP, TCS, TCC, AHTN, HHCB, and DDT, individually pose a negligible risk to the River Po. In contrast, PBDE, PCB, natural and synthetic estrogens, and to a much lower extent NP, were found at levels of concern either to aquatic life or human health. Adverse biological effects and prohibition of fish consumption deserve research attention and management initiatives, also considering the transport of contaminated sediments to transitional and coastal environments of the Italian river.

More Information
  • Emerging and priority contaminants with endocrine active potentials in sediments and fish from the River Po (Italy), US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, Environmental science and pollution research international, NCBI PubMed PMID: 25956513, 2015 Sep.
  • High levels of endocrine-disrupting chemicals found in sediments and fish from the Italian River Po and its Lambro tributary, Science for Environment Policy, January 2016.
  • Fishing Po image credit Edizonn.

Toujours plus de vaccins obligatoires

Dessin d’Ignace pour le Journal TV Libertés du Mercredi 07 Décembre 2016

Une couverture vaccinale toujous plus importante alors qu’aucune épidémie n’est crainte…

Endocrine Society Experts Concerned EU new Regulations will Undermine Chemicals Assessment

European Commission Proposal Leaves Public Exposed to Harmful Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

The Endocrine Society expressed disappointment today in the European Commission’s revised proposal on defining and identifying endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), citing unnecessarily narrow criteria for identifying EDCs that will make it nearly impossible for scientists to meet the unrealistically high burden of proof and protect the public from dangerous chemicals.

A new provision in the revised proposal also creates an extremely problematic exemption for EDCs that act by regulating the growth of harmful organisms via the endocrine system. This exemption would include pesticides that primarily aim at preventing certain insects from growing or reproducing, even though these chemicals also could have effects on non-target species.

European Commission Proposal Leaves Public Exposed to Harmful Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals, The Endocrine Society, December 19, 2016.

Shades of Blue image mlewallpapers.

EDCs can mimic, block or interfere with hormones that regulate key biological functions, including brain development, reproduction, metabolism and growth. Bisphenol A and other EDCs can be found in common products, including food containers, plastics, cosmetics and pesticides.

More than 1,300 studies have found connections between endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) exposure and serious health conditions such as infertility, diabetes, obesity, hormone-related cancers and neurological disorders, according to the Endocrine Society’s 2015 Scientific Statement.

The European Union is the largest single economy with regulations specific to EDCs. Enforcement of these regulations requires the European Commission to propose criteria to identify EDCs. The latest proposal asks for an unrealistically high level of scientific evidence for endocrine disruptors, limiting the ability to identify and regulate EDCs.

To effectively identify EDCs, the Endocrine Society supports creating multiple categories based on the amount of evidence that exists to show how specific chemicals act as EDCs. This approach would be similar to the classification scheme used for carcinogens. This would help prioritize chemicals for assessment and regulation and allow for incorporating new data as more studies are published. The latest proposal from the European Commission does not include categories for identifying EDCs.

Failure to effectively regulate EDCs comes with a high price tag. Recent studies have found that adverse health effects from EDC exposure cost the European Union more than €163 billion each year in healthcare expenses and lost productivity.

As the European Parliament and member countries consider whether to implement the European Commission’s criteria, the Society will continue to advocate for criteria that reflect the state of the science.

Above the Fog

A Life Journey with DES

above-the-fogAbove the Fog is a powerful story of one women’s struggle with DES (diethylstilbestrol).

The drug was developed in 1937 as the first synthetic estrogen. Millions of pregnant women who had previous miscarriages or premature births were given this drug in hopes of correcting the problem with their pregnancies.

Years later the tragic results started showing up in the daughters and later on in the sons – but the FDA did not contraindicated this drug until 1971 to all pregnant women.

This story is about one women, who never gave up in the face of her repeated health issues caused by DES or her family’s extraordinary health problems. She was determined to face the hard times with dignity and grace.

Author: Sue Carver, a wife, mother and grandmother based in Sequim Washington for the past 42 years.
Publisher: Outskirts Press, Inc.
Publication date:08/05/2016
Pages:230

More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Une couverture vaccinale encore plus importante alors qu’aucune épidémie n’est crainte

La dictature des vaccins

Vidéo publiée le 7 décembre 2016 par TV Libertés.

15:25 – Santé : la dictature des vaccins

What does Estrogen do?

Why is estrogen important and what can go wrong with estrogen levels?

Phthalates found in all urine samples of pregnant women tested in France

Bisphenol A was found in more than 70% of women tested

France’s biggest biomonitoring study has revealed traces of at least one endocrine disruptor in almost all 4,000 pregnant women surveyed.

The organic pollutants included in the study were bisphenol A, phthalates, pyrethroids (insecticides), dioxins, furans, PCBs, flame retardants and perfluorinated compounds.

Bisphenol A was found in more than 70% of women tested and almost all samples – 99.6% – had traces of phthalates. Samples from 208 women tested positive for at least one of the following substances: dioxins, furans and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). All three substances, all of which are now banned, persist for a long time in the environment.

EDCs found in almost all urine samples of pregnant women tested in France, Health and Environment Alliance, December 2016.

The principle source of exposure cited in the study is through food consumption. Other routes of high exposure include indoor and outdoor air.

The results were at a slightly lower level than in previous studies. Decreases may be partly explained by the introduction of regulations (atrazine, dioxins, furans) and reduced use due to industrial developments (bisphenol A, certain phthalates and organophosphate pesticides).

The results of the current study will be supplemented with findings on metal contaminants. A third phase will provide public health decision makers with recommendations on pyrethroids (being used as substitutes for organophosphate pesticides) and PCBs.

Soins du corps : n’achetez pas de cosmétiques (non bio ou non écologiques)

Biocoop et l’achat responsable, 2014

Le visuel pousse les gens à s’interroger sur leur acte de consommation et sur certains ingrédients des produits cosmétiques et d’hygiène corporelle.

A travers sa campagne 2014 de data-telling, Biocoop poursuivit son discours de sensibilisation sur la portée de l’acte d’achat. Les images présentent des produits de consommation courante et montrent les effets néfastes sur la planète et pour notre santé.

Cross-border reproductive care: an Ethics Committee opinion

Fertility and Sterility, Ethics Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, 2016

Abstract

Cross-border reproductive care (CBRC) is a growing worldwide phenomenon, raising questions about why assisted reproductive technology (ART) patients travel abroad, what harms and benefits may result, and what duties health-care providers may have in advising and treating patients who travel for reproductive services.

The factors that motivate patients to travel abroad for fertility care are varied, complex and often interrelated. The reasons for CBRC fall into four basic categories:

  • access,
  • cost,
  • regulation,
  • and privacy.

The delivery of CBRC does not invoke a duty to inform or warn patients about the potential legal or practical hazards that may accompany such care.

Cross-border care offers benefits and poses harms to ART stakeholders, including patients, offspring, providers, gamete donors, gestational carriers, and local populations in destination countries.

This document replaces the previous document of the same name, last published in 2013. Take off image by lattefarsan.

Fracking Chemicals Exposure May Harm Fertility Even at Very Low Dose

Adverse Reproductive and Developmental Health Outcomes Following Prenatal Exposure to a Hydraulic Fracturing Chemical Mixture in Female C57Bl/6 Mice

Unconventional oil and gas operations using hydraulic fracturing can contaminate surface and groundwater with endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

We have previously shown that 23 of 24 commonly used hydraulic fracturing chemicals can activate or inhibit the estrogen, androgen, glucocorticoid, progesterone, and/or thyroid receptors in a human endometrial cancer cell reporter gene assay and that mixtures can behave synergistically, additively, or antagonistically on these receptors.

Adverse Reproductive and Developmental Health Outcomes Following Prenatal Exposure to a Hydraulic Fracturing Chemical Mixture in Female C57Bl/6 Mice, Endocrine Society Endocrinology, July 05, 2016.

In the current study, pregnant female C57Bl/6 dams were exposed to a mixture of 23 commonly used unconventional oil and gas chemicals at approximately 3, 30, 300, and 3000 μg/kg·d, flutamide at 50 mg/kg·d, or a 0.2% ethanol control vehicle via their drinking water from gestational day 11 through birth.

This prenatal exposure to oil and gas operation chemicals suppressed pituitary hormone concentrations across experimental groups (prolactin, LH, FSH, and others), increased body weights, altered uterine and ovary weights, increased heart weights and collagen deposition, disrupted folliculogenesis, and other adverse health effects.

This work suggests potential adverse developmental and reproductive health outcomes in humans and animals exposed to these oil and gas operation chemicals, with adverse outcomes observed even in the lowest dose group tested, equivalent to concentrations reported in drinking water sources. These endpoints suggest potential impacts on fertility, as previously observed in the male siblings, which require careful assessment in future studies.