Normal vs. T-shaped Uterus

Utero-salpingography showing Diethylstilboestrol exposure in-utero uterus

Diethylstilboestrol (DES) exposure in-utero has been shown to have a potentially negative impact on pregnancy. Negative effects include an increased risk of early pregnancy loss, ectopic gestation and infertility.

These women may also present reproductive tract abnormalities leading to pregnancy complications. The most common anomalies include uterine defects such as T-shaped uterus or hypoplastic uterine cavity.

Image Sources

More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Getting Your Period when you are a Young DES Daughter…

The Devastating Effects of a 1940s ‘Wonder Pill’ Haunt Women Generations Later

” In the throes of puberty,14-year-old Su Robotti had developed “humongous breasts,” but she was still waiting for what she really wanted: her period. The year was 1969, and Robotti was filled with anxiety as she watched her friends, one-by-one, come to school and report that they had begun menstruating. All the while, she kept quiet, agonizing over when she’d ruin her first pair of underwear. At times, she even considered lying about it, but nervous thoughts would always inevitably halt her—she couldn’t even pretend she knew what cramps felt like.

Robotti’s mother, who had gotten her period when she was 12, was less anxious and more worried. At her mother’s insistence, Robotti found herself reclining in a gynecological chair. She watched as a doctor massage her lower abdomen as part of an external pelvic exam, and then listened to him deliver the report to her mother: Her reproductive organs were infant-sized and she only had one working ovary.

“I just felt like I wasn’t enough,” remembers Robotti today. At 59 years old, Robotti still hasn’t gotten her first period—and she never will. Robotti is a “DES daughter, …”

… continue reading The Devastating Effects of a 1940s ‘Wonder Pill’ Haunt Women Generations Later by Amanda Arnold on broadly, JAN 5 2017.

DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Bisphenol-A Concentrations among Workers in Industries that Manufacture and Use BPA

US workers making BPA have enormous loads of it in them

U.S. workers in industries that use or manufacture BPA have, on average, 70 times more of the chemical in their bodies than the general public—levels well above what has been shown to impact reproduction, according to a study published Wednesday.

Some workers’ contamination was more than a 1,000 times higher than the most exposed U.S. adults in the general population.

Abstract

Background
Bisphenol A (BPA) toxicity and exposure risk to humans has been the subject of considerable scientific debate; however, published occupational exposure data for BPA are limited.

Urinary Bisphenol A (BPA) Concentrations among Workers in Industries that Manufacture and Use BPA in the USA, The Annals of Occupational Hygiene, doi.org/10.1093/annweh/wxw021, 01 January 2017.

US workers making BPA have enormous loads of it in them, Environmental Health News, January 4, 2017.

Methods
In 2013–2014, 77 workers at six US companies making BPA, BPA-based resins, or BPA-filled wax provided seven urine samples over two consecutive work days (151 worker-days, 525 samples). Participant information included industry, job, tasks, personal protective equipment used, hygiene behaviors, and canned food/beverage consumption. Total (free plus conjugated) BPA, quantified in urine by mass spectrometry, was detected in all samples.

Results
The geometric mean (GM) creatinine-adjusted total BPA (total BPACR) concentration was 88.0 µg g−1 (range 0.78–18900 µg g−1), ~70 times higher than in US adults in 2013–2014 (1.27 µg g−1). GM total BPACR increased during Day 1 (26.6–127 µg g−1), decreased by pre-shift Day 2 (84.4 µg g−1) then increased during Day 2 to 178 µg g−1. By industry, baseline and post-baseline total BPACR was highest in BPA-filled wax manufacturing/reclaim (GM = 111 µg g−1) and lowest in phenolic resin manufacturing (GM = 6.56 µg g−1). By job, total BPACR was highest at baseline in maintenance workers (GM = 157 µg g−1) and post-baseline in those working with molten BPA-filled wax (GM = 441 µg g−1). Workers in the job of flaking a BPA-based resin had the lowest concentrations at baseline (GM = 4.81 µg g−1) and post-baseline (GM = 23.2 µg g−1). In multiple regression models, at baseline, industry significantly predicted increased total BPACR (P = 0.0248); post-baseline, handling BPA containers (P = 0.0035), taking ≥3 process/bulk samples with BPA (P = 0.0002) and wearing a Tyvek® coverall (P = 0.0042) significantly predicted increased total BPACR (after adjusting for total BPACR at baseline, time point, and body mass index).

Conclusion
Several work-related factors, including industry, job, and certain tasks performed, were associated with increased urinary total BPACR concentrations in this group of manufacturing workers. The potential for BPA-related health effects among these workers is unknown.

All Advertised and Grocery Store Products are Safe

EDCs Myth vs. Fact, The Hormone Health Network Infographic

Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are a serious risk in modern society. These chemical compounds can interfere with the way the body’s hormones work, and they are associated with an array of health issues. Worse, they are almost everywhere: in consumer products such as pesticides, plastics, food storage materials, personal care products, clothing and more, and they also are used in electronics and agriculture.

Unfortunately, a number of myths about EDCs being safe have been perpetuated because of a lack of understanding about the realities of these chemicals and their effects on the body.

Some people claim EDCs represent no risk at all, and that all of the warnings about them are scare tactics and exaggerated. Others present myths as facts just so product sales will not be hurt. To take or maintain control of your hormone health, you must understand EDC facts so you can make wise decisions regarding your health.

Sources

Endocrine Disruptors

Our Skin is a Barrier to Toxic Substances

EDCs Myth vs. Fact, The Hormone Health Network Infographic

Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are a serious risk in modern society. These chemical compounds can interfere with the way the body’s hormones work, and they are associated with an array of health issues. Worse, they are almost everywhere: in consumer products such as pesticides, plastics, food storage materials, personal care products, clothing and more, and they also are used in electronics and agriculture.

Unfortunately, a number of myths about EDCs being safe have been perpetuated because of a lack of understanding about the realities of these chemicals and their effects on the body.

Some people claim EDCs represent no risk at all, and that all of the warnings about them are scare tactics and exaggerated. Others present myths as facts just so product sales will not be hurt. To take or maintain control of your hormone health, you must understand EDC facts so you can make wise decisions regarding your health.

Sources

Endocrine Disruptors

All Household and Personal Care Products are Safe

EDCs Myth vs. Fact, The Hormone Health Network Infographic

Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are a serious risk in modern society. These chemical compounds can interfere with the way the body’s hormones work, and they are associated with an array of health issues. Worse, they are almost everywhere: in consumer products such as pesticides, plastics, food storage materials, personal care products, clothing and more, and they also are used in electronics and agriculture.

Unfortunately, a number of myths about EDCs being safe have been perpetuated because of a lack of understanding about the realities of these chemicals and their effects on the body.

Some people claim EDCs represent no risk at all, and that all of the warnings about them are scare tactics and exaggerated. Others present myths as facts just so product sales will not be hurt. To take or maintain control of your hormone health, you must understand EDC facts so you can make wise decisions regarding your health.

Sources

Endocrine Disruptors

Analyse comparative de familles victimes du Distilbène et d’agriculteurs victimes des pesticides

Coline Salaris, Science politique. Université de Bordeaux, 2015

Résumé

Se présenter comme victime et se mobiliser en tant que telle dans l’espace public ne va pas de soi, même pour les membres d’une association de victimes. Il s’agit d’un long processus d’intériorisation et de reformulation identitaires consistant à donner du sens à une expérience de souffrance ; une pathologie ou un deuil. Pour les membres d’un collectif de victimes se mobilisant dans le cadre d’un problème de santé publique, il s’agit aussi d’un processus d’ordre collectif consistant à construire un groupe suffisamment cohérent pour imposer des griefs a priori personnels, comme problème public de santé.

Mobilisations en souffrance : analyse comparative de la construction de deux problèmes de santé publique : (familles victimes du Distilbène et agriculteurs victimes des pesticides), Coline SALARIS, THÈSE PRÉSENTÉE POUR OBTENIR LE GRADE DE DOCTEUR DE L’UNIVERSITÉ DE BORDEAUX, 3 décembre 2015.

Hal-SHS Archives Ouvertes, halshs-tel-01278157, 2015.

C’est de ces multiples processus, à la fois individuels et collectifs, entre intime et public que se propose d’analyser cette thèse. En nous appuyant sur une enquête comparative entre l’affaire du Distilbène et la mobilisation de travailleurs agricoles victimes des pesticides – qui croise 77 entretiens semi-directifs et une quinzaine d’observations ethnographiques des temps qui articulent ces mobilisations -, nous nous sommes demandée comment des individus dispersés et blessés parviennent progressivement et collectivement à s’imposer comme des acteurs d’action publique, et plus précisément des acteurs de la santé publique.

Coline SALARIS, halshs-01278157
Science politique. Université de Bordeaux, 2015.

Le Distilbène DES, en savoir plus

Floating Microplastics in the Central and Western Mediterranean Sea

Estimated 1 455 tonnes of plastic floating in the Mediterranean

A rough total of 1 455 tonnes of floating plastic is present across the Mediterranean, estimates a new study. Researchers gathered floating plastics using trawl nets and found that microplastics with a surface area of around 1 square milimetre (mm²) were the most abundant size of plastic particles found.

Highlights

  • In a large-scale study of the Mediterranean Sea, plastic was found in all samples.
  • 579.3 g dw km−2 and 147,500 items km−2 were the average concentrations.
  • The most common particle size in the samples was 1 mm².
  • The proportion of plastic in all the marine debris sampled was 96.87%.
  • The general estimate obtained was a total value of 1455 tons dw of floating plastic for the entire Mediterranean region.

Abstract

Floating plastic debris in the Central and Western Mediterranean Sea, Marine Environmental Research, Volume 120, Pages 136–144, September 2016.

In two sea voyages throughout the Mediterranean (2011 and 2013) that repeated the historical travels of Archduke Ludwig Salvator of Austria (1847–1915), 71 samples of floating plastic debris were obtained with a Manta trawl. Floating plastic was observed in all the sampled sites, with an average weight concentration of 579.3 g dw km−2 (maximum value of 9298.2 g dw km−2) and an average particle concentration of 147,500 items km−2 (the maximum concentration was 1,164,403 items km−2). The plastic size distribution showed microplastics (<5 mm) in all the samples. The most abundant particles had a surface area of approximately 1 mm2 (the mesh size was 333 μm). The general estimate obtained was a total value of 1455 tons dw of floating plastic in the entire Mediterranean region, with various potential spatial accumulation areas.