Dry olive leaf extract attenuates DNA damage induced by DES in human peripheral blood cells in vitro

The protective potential of dry olive leaf extract could arise from the synergistic effect of its scavenging activity and enhancement of the cells’ antioxidant capacity

2018 Study Highlights

  • Antigenotoxic potential of DOLE was investigated on the human whole blood in vitro, using comet assay.
  • E2 and DES were used as DNA damage inducers, expressing a genotoxic effect.
  • DOLE exhibited antigenotoxic properties.

Abstract

Phenolic groups of steroidal or nonsteroidal estrogens can redox cycle, leading to oxidative stress, where creation of reactive oxygen species are recognized as the main mechanism of their DNA damage properties.

Dry olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf extract is known to contain bioactive and antioxidative components and to have an ability to modulate the effects of various oxidants in cells.

The main goal of this study was to investigate antigenotoxic potential of a standardized dry olive leaf extract on DNA damage induced by 17β-estradiol and diethylstilbestrol in human whole blood cells in vitro, using comet assay.

Our results indicated that both hormones showed a genotoxic effect at a concentration of 100 μM (P < 0.05, n = 6).

Dry olive leaf extract was efficient in reducing number of cells with estrogen-induced DNA damage at tested concentrations (0.125, 0.5 and 1 mg/mL) (P < 0.05, n = 6) and under two experimental protocols, pre-treatment and post-treatment, exhibiting antigenotoxic properties.

Analysis of antioxidant properties of the extract revealed moderate ABTS radical scavenging properties and reducing power.

Overall, our results suggested that the protective potential of dry olive leaf extract could arise from the synergistic effect of its scavenging activity and enhancement of the cells’ antioxidant capacity.

DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Author: DES Daughter

Activist, blogger and social media addict committed to shedding light on a global health scandal and dedicated to raise DES awareness.

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