Médicaments et grossesse : les bons réflexes, rappel ANSM 2018

De manière générale, l’utilisation de médicaments, y compris ceux vendus sans ordonnance, doit être évitée au cours de la grossesse

Points Clés

  • Prévenir son médecin d’un projet de grossesse
  • Pas d’automédication
  • Informer les professionnels de santé de sa grossesse
  • Ne pas arrêter un traitement sans avis médical

En cas d’affection aigue ou chronique le professionnel de santé peut envisager la nécessité d’un traitement médicamenteux chez une femme au cours de sa grossesse.

Si un traitement s’avère nécessaire, il revient au prescripteur d’en évaluer le bénéfice risque pour la patiente et son enfant à naître.

La patiente ne doit en aucun cas prendre un médicament sans avoir préalablement pris conseil auprès d’un professionnel de santé.

La patiente ne doit dans aucun cas arrêter ou modifier un traitement qui lui a été prescrit sans en avoir préalablement parlé avec son médecin, sa sage-femme ou son pharmacien. Cela peut entraîner des risques pour elle et/ou l’enfant à naître.

Dossier Spécial ANSM

Overtreatment : When Medicine Does More Harm Than Good

Why do millions of people a year get tests and procedures that they don’t really need ?

Researchers estimate that 21% of medical care is unnecessary.

Kaiser Health News senior correspondent Liz Szabo moderated a discussion a panel of experts to explore overtreatment.

KHN panelists were:

  • Dr. Louise Davies, An associate professor of otolaryngology – head and neck surgery in The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice
  • Dr. Saurabh Jha, an associate professor of radiology at the University of Pennsylvania
  • Dr. Barry Kramer, director of the division of cancer prevention at the National Cancer Institute
  • Dr. Jacqueline Kruser, a pulmonologist and critical care physician at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
  • Dr. Ranit Mishori, professor of family medicine at the Georgetown University School of Medicine.
  • Reference.
  • Video source : KHN was live.

Breast-feeding Lowers Your Breast Cancer Risk

CDC’s Dr. Lisa Richardson explains why breastfeeding your babies can lower your risk of breast cancer

Watch Dr. Lisa Richardson, an oncologist and Director of the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control at CDC, explain why breastfeeding your babies can lower your risk of breast cancer.

Breast Cancer Differences in Young Women

Differences in breast cancer incidence among young women aged 20–49 years by stage and tumor characteristics, age, race, and ethnicity, 2004–2013

A recent CDC study highlights the differences in breast cancer incidence among young women. Although breast cancer is not common among younger women, rates have remained stable in recent years. Breast cancers in young women are more likely to be found at later stages and with more aggressive, larger tumors. Based on data from CDC’s National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program, the study looked at breast cancer rates and trends by stage, grade, and tumor subtype, as well as age and race/ethnicity among women aged 20-49 years. From 2004-2013, the majority of invasive breast cancer cases (77.3%) occurred among women aged 40-49 years. Among women younger than 45 years old, black women had the highest breast cancer incidence. For women aged 45-49 years, white women had higher breast cancer incidence than black women. Across all age groups, incidence rates for triple-negative breast cancer were higher in black women than other races/ethnicities. These differences show that breast cancers in young women are highly diverse and in need of further research into personal and cultural factors. Take a look at our resource for triple-negative breast cancer.

Abstract

Purpose
Younger women diagnosed with breast cancer have poorer prognoses and higher mortality compared to older women. Young black women have higher incidence rates of breast cancer and more aggressive subtypes than women of other races/ethnicities. In this study, we examined recent trends and variations in breast cancer incidence among young women in the United States.

Methods
Using 2004–2013 National Program of Cancer Registries and Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program data, we calculated breast cancer incidence rates and trends and examined variations in stage, grade, and tumor subtype by age and race/ethnicity among young women aged 20–49 years.

Results
The majority of breast cancer cases occurred in women aged 40–44 and 45–49 years (77.3%). Among women aged < 45 years, breast cancer incidence was highest among black women. Incidence trends increased from 2004 to 2013 for Asian or Pacific Islander (API) women and white women aged 20–34 years. Black, American Indian or Alaska Native, and Hispanic women had higher proportions of cases diagnosed at later stages than white and API women. Black women had a higher proportion of grade III–IV tumors than other racial/ethnic groups. Across all age groups, incidence rates for triple-negative breast cancer were significantly higher in black women than women of other races/ethnicities, and this disparity increased with age.

Conclusions
Breast cancer among young women is a highly heterogeneous disease. Differences in tumor characteristics by age and race/ethnicity suggest opportunities for further research into personal and cultural factors that may influence breast cancer risk among younger women.

Réduire la contamination des perturbateurs endocriniens pendant la vie foetale

“Nous n’avons pas le droit de contaminer un million de foetus par an”

Une alerte de plus du professeur Sultan, endocrinologue pédiatrique à Montpellier.

The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics World Congress 2018

XXII FIGO 2018, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

The FIGO World Congress of Gynecology and Obstetrics is the single largest global congress on maternal and infant health, bringing together obstetricians, gynecologists and related health professionals from around the world.

The #FIGO2018 XXII FIGO World Congress of Gynecology and Obstetrics will take place in the beautiful city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from 14-19 October 2018.

Environmental threats to human health

FIGO Media Briefing, Environmental Health, London, 1 October, 2018

In the last 40 years, there has been a global increase in human exposure to a variety of potentially toxic chemicals in the environment.

Research shows that whether we are concerned with reproductive health, cancer, infertility, neonatal and childhood health or neurodevelopment; toxic exposures are implicated.

World leaders have acknowledged that minimising environmental threats to human health and reproduction is a necessity if we are to substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination, and therefore progress towards the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (SDGs).

“We are at the very beginning of a tsunami that will require local leadership: California has placed a priority on energy independence which can improve air quality and reduce birth defects, prematurity, asthma and heart disease. The European Union has limited exposure to endocrine disruptors. China instituted a host of measures in 2013, so that by 2018 there has been a reduction of air particulate matter by 32%. They declared a war on pollution and are winning!”

Jeanne Conry, MD, PhD, Co-Chair, FIGO Working Group on Reproductive and Developmental Environmental Health, USA.

91% of the world’s population lives in places where air quality exceeds WHO guideline limits. Air pollution is a major environmental risk to health. By reducing air pollution levels, countries can reduce the burden of disease from stroke, heart disease, lung cancer, and both chronic and acute respiratory diseases, including asthma. The lower the levels of air pollution, the better the cardiovascular and respiratory health of the population will be, both long- and short-term.

“Our first challenge is awareness: Most clinicians are not aware that environmental exposures impact health. Most of us assume that the chemicals released into the environment, that we are exposed to as we apply make-up, prepare food, or breathe air, have been studied. They have not. Clinicians need to understand that the lack of research doesn’t mean they are safe, and makes the burden of proof very difficult, because our patients are exposed repeatedly to many chemicals in many ways through many types of exposure”.

Jeanne Conry, MD, PhD, Co-Chair, FIGO Working Group on Reproductive and Developmental Environmental Health, USA

This month, October 14 – 19, over 10,000 health professionals are attending FIGO World Congress 2018 in Rio de Janiero. Environmental Health is a core theme throughout the event, with key sessions being covered include:

  • Impact of Environmental Toxics on Global Women’s Health
  • Environmental Reproductive Health and the Heath Care Provider: Evidence based approaches to providing advice
  • Research agenda to illuminate how the environment affects reproductive and developmental health
  • “Training the Trainers” to talk with their patients and the public about environmental impacts on health

“Our challenge is priorities: When we are faced with maternal mortality, cancer, and violence, it may seem we do not have the “band width” or capacity to discuss the environment. BUT we need to help clinicians understand they are equipped to discuss this subject and lead their patients in awareness, and that advocacy for change is essential”.

Jeanne Conry, MD, PhD, Co-Chair, FIGO Working Group on Reproductive and Developmental Environmental Health, USA.

Reference.

Le surtraitement lié au dépistage systématique, et les traitements inutiles

~Quand c’est gratuit, c’est vous le produit~
Gérard Delépine, Chirurgien et Cancérologue, septembre 2018

Le dépistage systématique du cancer du sein encouragé par Octobre Rose et les autorités françaises, cause de nombreuses souffrances inutiles, qui rapportent gros à l’industrie du cancer du sein.

On a ce devoir de faire sans pesticides, dit Paul François

“ça sera bon pour nos fermes, pour le consommateur, et pour l’environnement ” ~Paul François~

Fabrice Nicolino est allé à la rencontre de Paul François sur son exploitation agricole céréalière en Charente. Gravement intoxiqué à la suite d’un accident, il est passé du conventionnel au bio.

L’interdiction des pesticides: c’est ici et maintenant, dit Marie-Lys Bibeyran

“Nous voulons que nos enfants puissent vivre et survivre” ~Marie-Lys Bibeyran~

Ouvrière viticole en Gironde, Marie-Lys Bibeyran raconte son combat pour faire reconnaitre les maladies des ouvriers liés aux produits chimiques.

Marie-Lys Bibeyran anime un comité de bagarre contre les pesticides, le collectif Info Médoc Pesticides, depuis le drame qui a touché son frère.