Parental Depression, maternal AntiDepressant during Pregnancy, Autism Spectrum Disorders Risk

AntiDepressant use during Pregnancy and Childhood Autism Spectrum Disorders

Parental depression, maternal antidepressant use during pregnancy, and risk of autism spectrum disorders: population based case-control study
In utero exposure to SSRIs antidepressants is associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders

Objective:
To study the association between parental depression and maternal antidepressant use during pregnancy with autism spectrum disorders in offspring.

Design:
Population based nested case-control study.

Setting:
Stockholm County, Sweden, 2001-07.

Participants:
4429 cases of autism spectrum disorder (1828 with and 2601 without intellectual disability) and 43 277 age and sex matched controls in the full sample (1679 cases of autism spectrum disorder and 16 845 controls with data on maternal antidepressant use nested within a cohort (n=589 114) of young people aged 0-17 years.

Main outcome measure:
A diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, with or without intellectual disability.

Exposures:
Parental depression and other characteristics prospectively recorded in administrative registers before the birth of the child. Maternal antidepressant use, recorded at the first antenatal interview, was available for children born from 1995 onwards.

Results:
A history of maternal (adjusted odds ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.08 to 2.08) but not paternal depression was associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders in offspring. In the subsample with available data on drugs, this association was confined to women reporting antidepressant use during pregnancy (3.34, 1.50 to 7.47, P=0.003), irrespective of whether selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or non-selective monoamine reuptake inhibitors were reported. All associations were higher in cases of autism without intellectual disability, there being no evidence of an increased risk of autism with intellectual disability. Assuming an unconfounded, causal association, antidepressant use during pregnancy explained 0.6% of the cases of autism spectrum disorder.

Conclusions:
In utero exposure to both SSRIs and non-selective monoamine reuptake inhibitors (tricyclic antidepressants) was associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders, particularly without intellectual disability. Whether this association is causal or reflects the risk of autism with severe depression during pregnancy requires further research. However, assuming causality, antidepressant use during pregnancy is unlikely to have contributed significantly towards the dramatic increase in observed prevalence of autism spectrum disorders as it explained less than 1% of cases.

Sources: Read the full article Parental depression, maternal antidepressant use during pregnancy, and risk of autism spectrum disorders: population based case-control study
NCBI, Apr 2013 – Full PDF.

Watch “The Truth about Pills and Pregnancy”

BBC Panorama video with reporter Shelley Jofre

Many women have to take medicines while pregnant. But could they be risking the health of their unborn child? Decades after the Thalidomide scandal shocked the world, Panorama reveals how another medicine has damaged far more children. Drugs cannot be tested on pregnant women for ethical reasons, so doctors do not know if most prescription drugs are safe for the unborn child, and the system set up to monitor side-effects appears to be flawed. As evidence emerges that some common antidepressants are linked to heart defects in babies, the programme asks how much we really know about the safety of medicines women take while pregnant

    • Video by dixiefid64, Published on 3 Jul 2013.
    • The program is very interesting but unfortunately does not mention the DES drug tragedy. Once again DES is ignored. WHY? It would have been such a great opportunity. What’s wrong with DES? Is it because with DES, the Media can’t show upsetting photos of children born with no arms or legs like the victims of Thalidomide, or newborn babies who have undergone traumatic heart surgery because of the effects associated with the antidepressant drug their mum took during pregnancy? Is it because DES is the very first drug scandal which should have prevented many others to happen? All victims of drugs prescribed during pregnancy should join forces! The stories are all the same and highlights the same failure of our health system and the government response to the devastating consequences of these drugs. DES, Thalidomide, epilepsy drug Epilim, antidepressants … how many more victims are needed to put in place safeguards to protect mothers and their unborn child?
    • Find out more about DES exposure and the long-term health effects associated with prenatal exposure to DES drug.
More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Taking AntiDepressants in early Pregnancy is not worth taking

Antidepressants could be risk to unborn babies

Antidepressants 'could be risk to unborn babies'
Do you think those extra risks are really worth taking?

The risk posed by some popular antidepressants in early pregnancy is not worth taking for women with mild to moderate depression, an expert has warned. Professor Stephen Pilling says evidence suggests SSRIs can double the risk of a child being born with a heart defect.

Read Antidepressants ‘could be risk to unborn babies’
BBC News, 24 June 2013

Related posts:

Sadly for many DES daughters having their own children is not possible! Many of us who have experienced miscarriages, want to have kids but are struggling or unable to…

The Truth about Pills and Pregnancy

With BBC Panorama Reporter Shelley Jofre

The Truth about Pills and Pregnancy
Watch The Truth about Pills and Pregnancy with @BBCPanorama – Reporter @ShelleyJofre

Many women have to take medicines while pregnant. But could they be risking the health of their unborn child? Decades after the Thalidomide scandal shocked the world, Panorama reveals how another medicine has damaged far more children. Drugs cannot be tested on pregnant women for ethical reasons, so doctors do not know if most prescription drugs are safe for the unborn child, and the system set up to monitor side-effects appears to be flawed. As evidence emerges that some common antidepressants are linked to heart defects in babies, the programme asks how much we really know about the safety of medicines women take while pregnant.

On YouYube

Watch “The Truth about Pills and Pregnancy” video on YouTube

Broadcasts

  • On BBC One, Monday 1 Jul 2013 at 20:30.
  • On BBC News Channel, Thursday 4 Jul 2013 at 04:30.
  • On BBC Two, Friday 5 Jul 2013 at 00:20.
  • Reporter: Shelley Jofre.

Let’s see if the BBC mentions DES following the 2012 DES UK Media Coverage. Find out more about DES exposure and the long-term health effects associated with prenatal exposure to DES drug.

More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Pharmageddon, the Story of a Tragedy

Medicine and the marketers – the eclipse of care – Stockholm syndrome – doctoring the data – there is a solution

Pharmageddon, on Flickr
The Story of a Tragedy, by @DrDavidHealy

This searing indictment, Dr. David Healy‘s most comprehensive and forceful argument against the pharmaceuticalization of medicine, tackles problems in health care that are leading to a growing number of deaths and disabilities. Dr. David Healy, who was the first to draw attention to the now well-publicized suicide-inducing side effects of many anti-depressants, attributes our current state of affairs to three key factors: product rather than process patents on drugs, the classification of certain drugs as prescription-only, and industry-controlled drug trials. These developments have tied the survival of pharmaceutical companies to the development of blockbuster drugs, so that they must overhype benefits and deny real hazards. Dr. David Healy further explains why these trends have basically ended the possibility of universal health care in the United States and elsewhere around the world. He concludes with suggestions for reform of our currently corrupted evidence-based medical system.

Taking anti-depressants in early Pregnancy linked to Child Heart Defects

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in pregnancy and congenital malformations: population based cohort study

Anti-depressants pregnancy 'risk'
Do you think those extra risks are really worth taking?

Children born to women taking anti-depressants in early pregnancy have a small but important increased risk of heart defects, Danish researchers say.

Abstract

Objective
To investigate any association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) taken during pregnancy and congenital major malformations.

Design
Population based cohort study.

Participants
493 113 children born in Denmark, 1996-2003.

Main outcome measure
Major malformations categorised according to Eurocat (European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies) with additional diagnostic grouping of heart defects. Nationwide registers on medical redemptions (filled prescriptions), delivery, and hospital diagnosis provided information on mothers and newborns. Follow-up data available to December 2005.

Results
Redemptions for SSRIs were not associated with major malformations overall but were associated with septal heart defects (odds ratio 1.99, 95% confidence interval 1.13 to 3.53). For individual SSRIs, the odds ratio for septal heart defects was 3.25 (1.21 to 8.75) for sertraline, 2.52 (1.04 to 6.10) for citalopram, and 1.34 (0.33 to 5.41) for fluoxetine. Redemptions for more than one type of SSRI were associated with septal heart defects (4.70, 1.74 to 12.7)). The absolute increase in the prevalence of malformations was low—for example, the prevalence of septal heart defects was 0.5% (2315/493 113) among unexposed children, 0.9% (12/1370) among children whose mothers were prescribed any SSRI, and 2.1% (4/193) among children whose mothers were prescribed more than one type of SSRI.

Conclusion
There is an increased prevalence of septal heart defects among children whose mothers were prescribed an SSRI in early pregnancy, particularly sertraline and citalopram. The largest association was found for children of women who redeemed prescriptions for more than one type of SSRI.

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Sadly for many DES daughters having their own children is not possible! Many of us who have experienced miscarriages, want to have kids but are struggling or unable to…

Prenatal Exposures: should you be worried?

via “Prenatal Exposures Never Die”: the blog about epigenetics, autism, and the multigenerational tragedy of prenatal pharmaceutical use

Prenatal Exposures: Should You Be Worried?
Autism Exposed: “The” blog about epigenetics, autism, and the multigenerational tragedy of prenatal pharmaceutical use – PrenatalExposures.Blogspot.co.uk

Jill Escher from Autism Exposed addresses those questions in PrenatalExposures.Blogspot.co.uk latest bog post…
read Prenatal Exposures: Should You Be Worried?

Find out more about DES exposure and the long-term health effects associated with prenatal exposure to DES drug.

DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Prescription Drugs in the USA: 70% of Americans take some

Age and Sex Patterns of Drug Prescribing in a Defined American Population

Prescription Drugs: 7 Out Of 10 Americans Take At Least One, Study Finds
A lot of Americans are on prescription drugs

A new study from Mayo Clinic researchers shows that 70% of Americans take at least one prescription drug. The most commonly prescribed drug is antibiotics (taken by 17 percent of Americans) followed by antidepressants and opioids (each taken by 13 percent of Americans).

Read Prescription Drugs: 7 Out Of 10 Americans Take At Least One,
Study Finds
, HuffPost Health Living, 06/19/2013.

AntiDepressants and Pregnancy: Class-Action Suit highlights expectant Mothers rising use of SSRIs

The controversy surrounding antidepressants and pregnancy

The controversy surrounding antidepressants and pregnancy
The controversy surrounding antidepressants and pregnancy

Last December, the Supreme Court of British Columbia set a bold precedent: it green-lit the first class action suit in Canada alleging that an antidepressant taken by a woman during pregnancy caused a birth defect in her child. Faith Gibson of Surrey, B.C., named “representative plaintiff,” had been prescribed Paxil, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), in December 2002. Her daughter, Meah Bartram, was born in September 2005 with a hole in her heart. The defect was repaired months later, but Meah remains a “sickly” child, prone to infection. Two weeks after her birth, Health Canada and Paxil’s manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline Inc. (GSK), issued an advisory stating that paroxetine (Paxil’s generic name) taken in the first trimester may pose “an increased risk” of cardiovascular defects. ”

Read The controversy surrounding antidepressants and pregnancy
by Anne Kingston, April 20, 2013

The Push to Prescribe

Women and Canadian Drug Policy, by Anne Rochon Ford and Diane Saibil

The Push to prescribe: Women and Canadian Drug Policy, by Anne Rochon Ford and Diane Saibil on Flickr
The Push to prescribe: Women and Canadian Drug Policy, by Anne Rochon Ford and Diane Saibil.

In recent years, heated debate has surrounded the pharmaceutical industry and how it has gained unprecedented control over the evaluation, regulation, and promotion of its own products. As a result, drugs are produced, regulated, marketed, and used in ways that infiltrate many aspects of everyday life. The nature and extent of this infiltration, and how this has special meaning for women, are at the core of The Push to Prescribe.

The book delves into the world of prescription drugs in Canada, and considers the impact on the health of women. From the inadequate testing of many drugs on women in clinical trials, to the sometimes questionable portrayal of women in illegal prescription drug advertising, Canadian drug policy has not always paid attention to how women and men are affected differently.

This is an essential resource for a variety of courses in Health Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacology, Public Policy, Public Health, Health Policy, Women’s Studies, Women’s Health, as well as many Social Science courses in areas like Sociology and Political Science. It will also be of interest to a general audience, health professional organizations, government health associations, and consumer and women’s groups.

SPECIAL FEATURES

  • presents an approach that combines compelling evidence with social, political, and gender-based analyses
  • discusses the complexity surrounding women and pharmaceuticals and uses the best evidence to argue for changes that better reflect women’s needs in public health policy and that ensure those who are best suited to make these determinations are included in policy-making

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