Cervical Cancer – Michelle Whitlock’s Journey

Michelle Whitlock amazing journey included the need for a radical hysterectomy, the birth of a daughter by a surrogate, and the writing of a book chronicling her experiences with cervical cancer

As a young woman, Michelle L. Whitlock was diagnosed with cervical cancer.
Her amazing journey included the need for a radical hysterectomy, the birth of a daughter by a surrogate, and the writing of a book chronicling her experiences with this deadly cancer.

Michelle Whitlock’s book reviews
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What You Need to Know About Cervical Cancer

a @cansa Cervical Cancer infographic

Cervical-Cancer-Infographic
Watch @DES_Journal diaporama and posters album on Flickr.

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Watch @DES_Journal diaporama and health infographics album on  DES Diethylstilbestrol's photostream on Flickr

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Email your photos to des.daughter@gmail.com with a short description and title :-)

2010 Kathy Griffin public PAP smear video

My Life on the D-List, Season 6 Episode 6.

Telling Cervical Cancer to “suck it”! The 2010 Kathy Griffin‘s smear campaign included the first televised public pap smear!

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What is a Pap Smear?

a @CANSA Infocard

what-is-a-pap-smear
Watch @DES_Journal diaporama and posters album on Flickr.
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CervicalCancer Fact poster

Share this @magnolia_women poster during January Cervical Health Awareness Month

Cervical-Cancer-Fact poster
Watch @DES_Journal diaporama and posters album on Flickr.
You can share this @magnolia_women poster during the January Cervical Health Awareness Month.
On Flickr®

CervicalCancer and HPV slideshow presentation

Cervical Cancer is the 2nd most common cancer among South African women

The United States Congress designated January as Cervical Health Awareness Month.

CANSA places the focus on Cervical Cancer during the month of September.

Sources:

Womens HealthCare Confusion

Where exactly do I fit into this picture?

womens-health-confusion cartoon
Watch @DES_Journal diaporama and health comics album on Flickr. Cartoon by penroseonpolitics

On Flickr®

Watch @DES_Journal diaporama and health cartoons album on  DES Diethylstilbestrol's photostream on Flickr

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Email your photos to des.daughter@gmail.com with a short description and title :-)

Cervical Cancer: an overview of the NCI fact sheet on Pap and HPV testing

Pap and HPV Testing fact sheet, National Cancer Institute

Pap-and-HPV-Testing image
Screening for cervical cancer is in the news. Below is an overview of @theNCI fact sheet on Pap and HPV testing.

Key Points

  • Cervical cancer screening, which includes the Pap test and HPV testing, is an essential part of a woman’s routine health care because it can detect cancer or abnormalities that may lead to cancer of the cervix.
  • Current guidelines recommend that women should have a Pap test every 3 years beginning at age 21. These guidelines further recommend that women ages 30 to 65 should have HPV and Pap cotesting every 5 years or a Pap test alone every 3 years. Women with certain risk factors may need to have more frequent screening or to continue screening beyond age 65.
  • Women who have received the HPV vaccine still need regular cervical screening.

Questions

  • What causes cervical cancer?
  • What is cervical cancer screening?
  • How is cervical cancer screening done?
  • When should a woman begin cervical cancer screening, and how often should she be screened?
  • What are the benefits of Pap and HPV cotesting?
  • Can HPV testing be used alone for cervical cancer screening?
  • How are the results of cervical cancer screening tests reported?
  • What follow-up tests are done if cervical cancer screening results are abnormal?
  • How are cervical abnormalities treated?
  • Do women who have been vaccinated against HPV still need to be screened for cervical cancer?
  • What are the limitations of cervical cancer screening?

Read Pap and HPV Testing fact sheet, National Cancer Institute.

More information
  • Cervical Cancer Risk for 330,000 Women Undergoing Concurrent HPV Testing and Cervical Cytology in Routine Clinical Practice at a Large Managed Care Organization, PMC3272857, Feb 6, 2012.
  • Screening for cervical cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement, annals 1183214, 19 June 2012 .
  • American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer, PMC3801360, Mar 14, 2012.
  • Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer, PubMed 17826171, 2007 Sep 8.
  • Human papillomavirus testing in the prevention of cervical cancer, PMC3046952, Mar 2, 2011.
  • Natural history of human papillomavirus infections, cytologic and histologic abnormalities, and cancer, PubMed 19061814, 2008 Dec.
  • Reassurance Against Future Risk of Precancer and Cancer Conferred by a Negative Human Papillomavirus Test, JNCI 106/8/dju153, May 2, 2014.

Cervical Health Awareness

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month

Cervical Health Awareness Month
You can share this @StopHPVCancer poster during the January Cervical Health Awareness Month.
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On Flickr®

Rates of Cervical Cancer in the U.S. underestimated

A May 2014 study says the cervical cancer rates in black women and women in their 60s are understated because they include those who have had hysterectomies

Rates of cervical cancer are higher than previously reported, according to a May 2014 study, specifically among older women and black women.

Abstract:

TIMEHealth logo
A May 2014 study says the cervical cancer rates in black women and women in their 60s are understated because they include those who have had hysterectomies.

BACKGROUND:
Invasive cervical cancer is thought to decline in women over 65 years old, the age at which cessation of routine cervical cancer screening is recommended. However, national cervical cancer incidence rates do not account for the high prevalence of hysterectomy in the United States.

METHODS:
Using estimates of hysterectomy prevalence from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), hysterectomy-corrected age-standardized and age-specific incidence rates of cervical cancer were calculated from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 18 registry in the United States from 2000 to 2009. Trends in corrected cervical cancer incidence across age were analyzed using Joinpoint regression.

RESULTS:
Unlike the relative decline in uncorrected rates, corrected rates continue to increase after age 35-39 (APC(CORRECTED) = 10.43) but at a slower rate than in 20-34 years (APC(CORRECTED) = 161.29). The highest corrected incidence was among 65- to 69-year-old women, with a rate of 27.4 cases per 100,000 women as opposed to the highest uncorrected rate of 15.6 cases per 100,000 aged 40 to 44 years. Correction for hysterectomy had the largest impact on older, black women given their high prevalence of hysterectomy.

CONCLUSIONS:
Correction for hysterectomy resulted in higher age-specific cervical cancer incidence rates, a shift in the peak incidence to older women, and an increase in the disparity in cervical cancer incidence between black and white women. Given the high and nondeclining rate of cervical cancer in women over the age of 60 to 65 years, when women are eligible to exit screening, risk and screening guidelines for cervical cancer in older women may need to be reconsidered.

Sources and more information:
  • Rates of Cervical Cancer Are Underestimated, Study Says,
    Time, May 12, 2014.
  • Increased age and race-specific incidence of cervical cancer after correction for hysterectomy prevalence in the United States from 2000 to 2009, NCBI PMID: 24821088, 2014 Jul 1;120(13):2032-8. doi: 10.1002/cncr.28548. Epub 2014 May 12.
    Full study on ReadCube.