Les effets à long terme du Distilbène

Reportage RTBF.be, avril 2011

Vidéo publiée le 2 novembre 2016 par la chaine DiEthylStilbestrol DES.

Qu’en est-il du DES en Belgique en 2011?

RTBF et support

Le Distilbène DES, en savoir plus

Autism outcomes in DES grandchildren : support the first study !

Help Fund Research into Neurodevelopment and Behavioral Impacts of DES

” My name is Jill Escher. I’m a science philanthropist who kickstarts pioneering research projects investigating the generational toxicity of certain potent exposures, including DES, tobacco and other drugs. While I’m not a DES daughter, I was exposed to a multitude of other synthetic steroid hormones in utero as part of a then-popular, if ineffective, “anti-miscarriage” practice. You can read my story here. You can see my science website at GermlineExposures.org.

Based on human, animal, and in vitro studies, as well as family interviews, I hypothesize that diethylstilbestrol DES, along with several other toxic substances, can damage the genomic information in early fetal-stage gametes. For a variety of reasons, the early gamete is probably the single most vulnerable stage of the human lifecycle. Damage during that phase, which could be genetic or epigenetic in nature, can manifest as abnormal development in the subsequent offspring.

For example, I hypothesize that the intensive synthetic steroid hormone drug regimen to which I was subjected as a fetus subtly deranged the molecular programming of my early eggs. This derangement I believe resulted in the starkly abnormal neurodevelopment — autism — of my children. I have met many other families with the same story.

Support Research into the Far-Reaching Generational Toxicity of DES, germline exposures, 10/10/2016.

Autism by pycik.

I am pleased to announce that I am funding the world’s first research study into the grandchild effects of DES (3d gen), looking specifically at neurodevelopment and behavioral impacts. This work will be done in collaboration with Harvard University, based on the Nurses’ Health Study II.

Thank you for your support! If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to email me. “

Jill Escher, President of Autism Society San Francisco Bay Area, 10/10/2016.

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Le Distilbène en 2016 (4/4)

Que retenir du guide pratique DES destinés aux professionnels de santé?

Vidéo publiée le 1er septembre 2016 par l’ Association Réseau DES FRANCE DISTILBENE.

Synthèse de l’étude Distilbène 3 générations, 2016.

Guide Pratique

Suite à l’étude Distilbène 3 générations qu’elle a initiée en 2013, l’association Réseau D.E.S. France a publié, fin 2015, un guide pratique pour les professionnels de la santé, synthétisant les données actuelles de la science. Deux versions sont à télécharger:

Le Distilbène DES, en savoir plus

Le Distilbène en 2016 (3/4)

Conséquences pour les petits-enfants DES

Vidéo publiée le 1er septembre 2016 par l’ Association Réseau DES FRANCE DISTILBENE.

En 2016, quelles sont les conséquences du DES pour la troisième génération?

Guide Pratique

Suite à l’étude Distilbène 3 générations qu’elle a initiée en 2013, l’association Réseau D.E.S. France a publié, fin 2015, un guide pratique pour les professionnels de la santé, synthétisant les données actuelles de la science. Deux versions sont à télécharger:

Le Distilbène DES, en savoir plus

Le Distilbène en 2016 (2/4)

Conséquences pour les mères, les filles et les fils DES

Vidéo publiée le 1er septembre 2016 par l’ Association Réseau DES FRANCE DISTILBENE.

En 2016, quelles sont les conséquences du DES pour les mères, filles et fils exposés?

Guide Pratique

Suite à l’étude Distilbène 3 générations qu’elle a initiée en 2013, l’association Réseau D.E.S. France a publié, fin 2015, un guide pratique pour les professionnels de la santé, synthétisant les données actuelles de la science. Deux versions sont à télécharger:

Le Distilbène DES, en savoir plus

Le Distilbène en 2016 (1/4)

Téléchargez le guide pratique pour le suivi médical

Vidéo publiée le 1er septembre 2016 par l’ Association Réseau DES FRANCE DISTILBENE.

En 2016, quelles connaissances scientifiques des conséquences du DES?

Guide Pratique

Suite à l’étude Distilbène 3 générations qu’elle a initiée en 2013, l’association Réseau D.E.S. France a publié, fin 2015, un guide pratique pour les professionnels de la santé, synthétisant les données actuelles de la science. Deux versions sont à télécharger:

Le Distilbène DES, en savoir plus

DES Health Information Record for Men and Women

CDC’s DES Update, For Consumers, Download DES materials

This health information record can help you manage your health decisions and help you discuss questions about DES exposure with your health care provider.

Each family member exposed to DiEthylStilbestrol DES should complete a DES Health Information Record – you can download, print and photocopy this record.

Download additional DES brochures on the CDC’s DES Update Web site.

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Environmental signaling: from environmental estrogens to endocrine-disrupting chemicals and beyond

Environmental chemicals mimic hormones or other metabolic signaling molecules and behavioral experience can be transduced into chemical signals that also modify gene expression

Abstract

The landmark report (Herbst et al. 1971) linking prenatal treatment with a synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), to cancer at puberty in women whose mothers took the drug while pregnant ushered in an era of research on delayed effects of such exposures on functional outcomes in offspring.

An animal model developed in our laboratory at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences confirmed that DES was the carcinogen and exposure to DES caused, as well, functional alterations in the reproductive, endocrine, and immune systems of male and female mice treated in utero.

American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology, NCBI PubMed PMID: 27230799, 2016 May 27.

Lighthouse at sunset, Aaron.

DES was also being used in agriculture and we discovered, at the first meeting on Estrogens in the Environment in 1979 (Estrogens in the Environment, 1980), that many environmental contaminants were also estrogenic.

Many laboratories sought to discern the basis for estrogenicity in environmental chemicals and to discover other hormonally active xenobiotics. Our laboratory elucidated how DES and other estrogenic compounds worked by altering differentiation through epigenetic gene imprinting, helping explain the transgenerational effects found in mice and humans.

At the Wingspread Conference on the Human-Wildlife Connection in 1991 (Advances in Modern Environmental Toxicology, 1992), we learned that environmental disruption of the endocrine system occurred in many species and phyla, and the term endocrine disruption was introduced.

Further findings of transgenerational effects of environmental agents that mimicked or blocked various reproductive hormones and the ubiquity of environmental signals, such as Bisphenol-A increased concern for human and ecological health.

Scientists began to look at other endocrine system aspects, such as cardiovascular and immune function, and other nuclear receptors, with important observations regarding obesity and metabolism. Laboratories, such as ours, are now using stem cells to try to understand the mechanisms by which various environmental signals alter cell differentiation.

Since 2010, research has shown that trauma and other behavioral inputs can function as ‘environmental signals,’ can be encoded in gene regulation networks in a variety of cells and organs, and can be passed on to subsequent generations. So now we come full circle: environmental chemicals mimic hormones or other metabolic signaling molecules and now behavioral experience can be transduced into chemical signals that also modify gene expression.

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Magnetic resonance imaging of Müllerian duct anomalies in children

MRI is widely considered the best modality for assessing Müllerian duct anomalies

Abstract

Müllerian duct anomalies encompass a wide variety of disorders resulting from abnormalities in the embryological development of the Müllerian ducts. In the prepubertal pediatric population, Müllerian duct anomalies are often incidental findings on studies obtained for other reasons. The onset of menses can prompt more clinical symptoms. Proper characterization of Müllerian duct anomalies is important because these anomalies can affect the development of gynecological disorders as well as fertility. Müllerian duct anomalies also carry a high association with other congenital anomalies, particularly renal abnormalities.

National Institutes of Health, NCBI PubMed PMID: 27229498, 2016 May.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely considered the best modality for assessing Müllerian duct anomalies; it provides multiplanar capability, clear anatomical detail and tissue characterization without ionizing radiation. MRI allows for careful description of Müllerian duct anomalies, often leading to classification into the most widely accepted classification system for Müllerian duct anomalies. This system, developed by the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, includes seven subtypes:

  1. uterine agenesis/hypoplasia,
  2. unicornuate,
  3. didelphys,
  4. bicornuate,
  5. septate,
  6. arcuate,
  7. and diethylstilbestrol (DES) drug-related uterus.

In cases of complex anomalies that defy classification, MRI allows detailed depiction of all components of the anatomical abnormality, allowing for proper management and surgical planning.

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Prenatal female hormone administration and psychosexual development in human males

Human personality is associated with prenatal hormone exposure

Abstract

ScienceDirect Psychoneuroendocrinology, doi:10.1016/0306-4530(80)90032-3, Volume 5, Issue 4, 1980, Pages 269–285 and Popline Document Number: 001953, node/460051, 1980 Dec.

Male personality by Meghana Kulkarni.

  • Considerable data exist from animal research relating prenatal hormone levels to postnatal behaviors in the male. The data from human males are few. One strategy for testing this association is the study of humans exposed prenatally to exogenous ‘pregnancy maintaining hormones’.
  • A follow-up study was conducted on 62 adult males prenatally exposed to exogenous sex hormones. Fifty-eight young adult males exposed to one of four hormone regimens were matched against nonhormone exposed controls. There were 17 males exposed to diethylstilbestrol (DES), 22 exposed to DES and natural progesterone, 10 to natural progesterone only, and 13 to synthetic progesterone.
  • Subjects were interviewed – to ascertain their psychosexual development during boyhood and adolescence and sexual functioning during adolescence and adulthood – and administered the Bem Sex-Role Inventory (BSRI), the Guilford-Zimmerman Temperament Survey (GZTS), the Strong Vocational Interest Blank (SVIB), and the Embedded Figures Test (EFT).
  • The specific drug, total dosage, and time of drug administration i.e., the trimester of exposure, were significantly associated with several aspects of boyhood, adolescent, and adult psychosexual development on interview and with differences in scales of the psychometric tests.
  • The behavior of subjects exposed to each substance was compared to the control behavior and to behavior of those exposed to other substances. The femininity scale was elevated for 3 of the 4 drug regimens but not for the natural progesterone group.
  • The most contrasting boyhood behaviors were between those exposed to progesterone and DES. Progesterone subjects tended to recall boyhood behaviors which departed from the conventional male mode toward ‘femininity’. The DES subjects tended to recall the most conventionally ‘masculine’ boyhoods. During adulthood, DES plus natural progesterone subjects reported a high sex drive while synthetic progesterone subjects reported a low sex drive. Erectile failure was more often reported by subjects exposed to natural progesterone only.
  • Three drug regimens were associated with elevations of the Feminine scale of the BSRI and two with elevations of the feminine scale of the GZTS.
  • The rates of homosexual behavior were comparable for drug and non-drug-exposed subjects.
  • The study illustrates that human personality is associated with prenatal hormone exposure.

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