Noresthisterone period delay pill now sold over the counter : is it safe ?

What will be the real cost of “giving women more choices” and messing with their bodies” ?

“The Period Delay Pill has been available on our Online Doctor service previously and now introducing it in our pharmacies and nurse clinics with a consultation and questionnaire allows women to make the choice easily and quickly should they choose to delay their period.”

Michael Henry, healthcare director for Superdrug.

Reported Side Effects

Asthma; cardiac dysfunction; conditions that may worsen with fluid retention; diabetes (progestogens can decrease glucose tolerance—monitor patient closely); epilepsy; history of depression; hypertension; migraine; susceptibility to thromboembolism (particular caution with high dose).

When used for contraception

Active trophoblastic disease (until return to normal of urine- and plasma-gonadotrophin concentration)—seek specialist advice; arterial disease; functional ovarian cysts; history of jaundice in pregnancy; malabsorption syndromes; past ectopic pregnancy; sex-steroid dependent cancer; systemic lupus erythematosus with positive (or unknown) anti-phospholipid antibodies with intramuscular use for contraception disturbances of lipid metabolism; history during pregnancy of deterioration of otosclerosis; history during pregnancy of pruritus; possible risk of breast cancer.

Cautions, further information

A possible small increase in the risk of breast cancer should be weighed against the benefits.

The product literature advises caution in patients with history of thromboembolism, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and migraine; evidence for caution in these conditions is unsatisfactory.

Read NICE guidelines about norethisterone.

“Like the contraceptive pill, period delay pills are not side-effect free. Norethisterone is a synthetic version of the naturally occurring hormone progesterone and, like the other synthetic hormones in contraception, it can cause breast tenderness, nausea, headaches, low libido and, crucially, ‘disturbances in mood’. What the NHS likely means by this is mental health side effects which can range from ‘feeling a bit low’ to full-blown depression and anxiety. No two women are the same and so no two women will respond to a pill in the same way.”

Read Why no one’s talking about the worrying side effects of period delay tablets on Metro, 10 Aug 2019.

Petites-filles DES : malformations utérines, fertilité, reproduction

Professeur Michel Tournaire, Réseau DES France, Forum d’Infertilité 2017

Vidéos en français: Distilbène DES : 60 vidéos à visionner sur YouTube.

Le troisième génération de victimes du médicament Distilbène® arrive aujourd’hui en âge de procréer.

Qu’en est-il au niveau de leur fertilité et risques supplémentaires en cas de grossesse ?

Le Professeur Michel Tournaire, membre du Conseil Scientifique de Réseau DES France, présente de nouveaux résultats de l’étude Distilbène 3 générations :

  • petites filles DES : malformations utérines.
  • petites filles DES : fertilité et reproduction.

Enregistrement provenant de la 4ème Journée Nationale de l’Infertilité, un forum d’information et d’aide aux personnes infertiles organisé cet automne 2017, Paris 12.

Le Distilbène DES, en savoir plus

Effect of diethylstilbestrol on reproductive function

DES-exposed patients must be observed closely for ectopic pregnancy, spontaneous abortion, and PTD

berceau_newborn image
In 1999, Jeffrey M. Goldberg, M.D., and Tommaso Falcone, M.D reviewed 60 references about DES in order to publish their summary on fertility and sterility issues related to DES exposure.

1999 Study Abstract

OBJECTIVE:
To review the effects of in utero exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) on müllerian development and subsequent reproductive function.

DESIGN:
The literature on DES and reproductive function was reviewed and summary data are presented. The studies were identified through the computerized MEDLINE database and a manual search of relevant bibliographies.

RESULT(S):
In utero exposure to DES resulted in reduced fertility and increased rates of ectopic pregnancy, spontaneous abortion, and preterm delivery.

CONCLUSION(S):
An understanding of the reproductive performance of women who were exposed to DES in utero is useful for counseling these patients regarding their risks and treatment options.

1999 Study Summary

In the wake of the DES and thalidomide tragedies, the effect of new pharmaceuticals on pregnancy is now considered and medications are used more judiciously during pregnancy. The anatomic changes associated with exposure to DES in utero are well known even though the pathogenic mechanisms are not. Although new cases of vaginal clear cell adenocarcinoma resulting from exposure to DES in utero are not expected at this point, an unknown number of exposed women are still facing several reproductive hazards in their quest for a viable live birth. These patients must be observed closely for ectopic pregnancy, spontaneous abortion, and PTD. In spite of their poor obstetric histories, they can be reassured that approximately 80% ultimately will be successful. Surgical correction of the structural abnormalities in an attempt to improve their reproductive performance is not advised. The use of prophylactic cervical cerclage may be beneficial, but a consensus is lacking.

Sources
  • Effect of diethylstilbestrol on reproductive function, Goldberg JM1, Falcone T., Fertil Steril. 1999 Jul;72(1):1-7., NCBI PMID: 10428139.
  • Full text, FERTILITY AND STERILITY, VOL. 72, NO. 1, JULY 1999, S0015-0282(99)00153-3.
More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Infertility among Women exposed prenatally to DiEthylStilbestrol

DES-exposed women have a higher risk of infertility

2001 Study Abstract

pubmed logo
DES-exposed women have a higher risk of infertility

Although it is well established that women exposed to diethylstilbestrol in utero have an increased risk of spontaneous abortion, ectopic pregnancy, and preterm delivery, it is not known whether they also have an increased risk of infertility. The authors assessed this question in data from a collaborative follow-up study of the offspring of women who took diethylstilbestrol during pregnancy. In 1994, 1,753 diethylstilbestrol-exposed and 1,050 unexposed women from an ongoing cohort study (National Cooperative Diethylstilbestrol Adenosis Study and Dieckmann cohorts) provided data on difficulties in conceiving and reasons for the difficulty. Age-adjusted relative risks were computed for the association of diethylstilbestrol exposure with specific types of infertility. A greater proportion of exposed than unexposed women were nulligravid (relative risk (RR) = 1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 1.5), and a greater proportion had tried to become pregnant for at least 12 months without success (RR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.6, 2.1). Diethylstilbestrol exposure was significantly associated with infertility due to uterine and tubal problems, with relative risks of 7.7 (95% CI: 2.3, 25) and 2.4 (95% CI: 1.2, 4.6), respectively. The present findings indicate that diethylstilbestrol-exposed women have a higher risk of infertility than do unexposed women and that the increased risk of infertility is primarily due to uterine or tubal problems.

Sadly for many DES daughters having their own children is not possible! Many of us who have experienced miscarriages, want to have kids but are struggling or unable to…

Sources

  • Infertility among women exposed prenatally to diethylstilbestrol,NCBI, PMID: 11495854, 2001 Aug 15;154(4):316-21. Full text: Oxford Journals Medicine & Health International Journal of Epidemiology link.
  • NCI, DES Follow-up Study Published Papers.
More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

A Comparison of Pregnancy Experience in DES-exposed and DES-unexposed Daughters

In this 1980 study, the difference in pregnancy outcomes between the DES daughters and the unexposed is highly significant

A comparison of pregnancy experience in DES-exposed and DES-unexposed daughters
Pregnancy outcomes in DES Daugters are worse than those in unexposed women

Reproductive histories were compared for 226 diethylstilbestrol-exposed daughters and 203 DES-unexposed daughters whose mothers participated in a double-blind evaluation 27 years before. Irregular menstruation was slightly more common among the exposed (10%) than among the unexposed (4%). Nineteen of the exposed and only four of the unexposed had primary infertility. Among those at risk, 86% of the unexposed and 67% of the exposed had become pregnant. The reasons for these differences are not known. Comparison of evaluable first pregnancy outcome revealed full-term live birth to be more common among the unexposed (85%) than the exposed (47%). Premature live birth was experienced by 22% of the exposed but only 7% of the unexposed. Nonviable outcomes of stillbirth, neonatal death, miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy occurred in 31% of the exposed and 8% of the unexposed. The difference in pregnancy outcomes between the groups is highly significant. The DES-exposed with transverse cervicovaginal ridges were more likely to experience a nonviable outcome. Overall 82% of the exposed and 93% of the unexposed had at least one live offspring.

Sources: A comparison of pregnancy experience in DES-exposed and DES-unexposed daughters, NCBI, Dr Herbst A, Feb 1980

Related post: Continued follow-up of #Pregnancy Outcomes in #DiEthylStilbestrol-exposed Offspring, by Dr Herbst A, Oct 2000

Sadly for many DES daughters having their own children is not possible! Many of us who have experienced miscarriages, want to have kids but are struggling or unable to…
More about DES pregnancy risks – our posts tagged pregnancy

More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Continued follow-up of Pregnancy Outcomes in DiEthylStilbestrol-exposed Offspring

Pregnancy outcomes in DES-exposed women are worse than those in unexposed women

2000 Study Abstract

Continued follow-up of pregnancy outcomes in diethylstilbestrol-exposed offspring
Pregnancy outcomes in DES Daugters are worse than those in unexposed women

Objective
To evaluate long-term pregnancy experiences of women exposed to diethylstilbestrol (DES) in utero compared with unexposed women.

Methods
This study was based on diethylstilbestrol-exposed daughters, the National Collaborative Diethylstylbistrol Adenosis cohort and the Chicago cohort, and their respective nonexposed comparison groups. Subjects who could be traced were sent a detailed questionnaire in 1994 that contained questions on health history, including information on pregnancies and their outcomes. We reviewed 3373 questionnaires from exposed daughters and 1036 questionnaires from unexposed women.

Results
The response rate was 88% among exposed and unexposed women. Diethylstilbestrol-exposed women were less likely than unexposed women to have had full-term live births and more likely to have had premature births, spontaneous pregnancy losses, or ectopic pregnancies. Full-term infants were delivered in the first pregnancies of 84.5% of unexposed women compared with 64. 1% of exposed women identified by record review (relative risk [RR] 0.76, confidence interval [CI] 0.72, 0.80). Preterm delivery of first births occurred in 4.1% of unexposed compared with 11.5% of exposed women, and ectopic pregnancies in 0.77% of unexposed compared with 4.2% of exposed women. Spontaneous abortion was reported in 19.2% of DES-exposed women compared with 10.3% in control women (RR 2.00, CI 1.54, 2.60). According to complete pregnancy histories (many women had more than one pregnancy), preterm births were more common in DES-exposed women (19.4% exposed versus 7.5% unexposed (RR 2.93 CI 2.23, 3.86). Second-trimester spontaneous pregnancy losses were more common in DES-exposed women (6.3% versus 1.6%; RR 4.25, CI 2.36, 7.66). More first-trimester spontaneous abortions occurred in DES-exposed women than in controls (RR 1.31, CI 1.13, 1.53), and DES-exposed women had at least one ectopic pregnancy more often than unexposed women (RR 3.84, CI 2.26, 6.54).

Conclusion
Pregnancy outcomes in DES-exposed women were worse than those in unexposed women.

Sources: Continued follow-up of pregnancy outcomes in diethylstilbestrol-exposed offspringNCBI, Dr Herbst A, Oct 2000 – full PDF.

Sadly for many DES daughters having their own children is not possible! Many of us who have experienced miscarriages, want to have kids but are struggling or unable to… Read more about DES pregnancy risks – our posts tagged pregnancy.

More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Infertility among Daughters either exposed or not exposed to DiEthylStilbestrol

Higher infertility rate and abnormalities found in the DES Daughters

Infertility among daughters either exposed or not exposed to diethylstilbestrol
Higher infertility rate and abnormalities found in the DES Daughters

Infertility was examined among 343 diethylstilbestrol-exposed and 303 unexposed daughters whose mothers participated in an evaluation of diethylstilbestrol use during pregnancy 35 years ago. Of the married individuals who were not using contraception and who were actively trying to conceive, a greater proportion of diethylstilbestrol-exposed women than unexposed subjects experienced primary infertility (33% versus 14%, p less than 0.001). Among those with primary infertility, abnormal hysterosalpingograms were observed in 46% of the diethylstilbestrol-exposed group and in none of the unexposed group (p less than 0.02), while tubal abnormalities were found in 42% of the exposed and in none of the unexposed (p = 0.02). First pregnancies were achieved by 40 (58%) women exposed to diethylstilbestrol and 18 (64%) unexposed subjects. Twenty-four (60%) of the exposed women and 15 (83%) of the unexposed individuals who conceived had a live-born infant who survived. The estimated cumulative rate of first pregnancy was 16% for the exposed group and 36% for the unexposed group at 12 months after the diagnosis of primary infertility (p less than 0.05).

Sadly for many DES daughters having their own children is not possible! Many of us who have experienced miscarriages, want to have kids but are struggling or unable to…
More about DES pregnancy risks – our posts tagged pregnancy

Sources: Infertility among daughters either exposed or not exposed to diethylstilbestrol, NCBI, Dr Herbst A, Mar 1988

More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Reproductive and gynecologic surgical Experience in DiEthylStilbestrol-exposed Daughters

American journal of obstetrics and gynecology, 1981

Reproductive and gynecologic surgical experience in diethylstilbestrol-exposed daughters
Higher proportion of premature births, spontaneous abortions, and ectopic pregnancies in the DES Daughters

Information on reproductive history, gynecologic operations, and examinations was analyzed for 338 diethylstilbestrol (DES)-exposed and 298 unexposed women whose mothers participated in an evaluation of DES use in pregnancy 28 years ago. A history of infrequent menses (less often than every 36 days) was reported more commonly by the exposed women (32%) than by the unexposed women (15%) and the mean duration of menstrual flow was also less. A greater number of exposed women than unexposed women experienced primary infertility (53 versus 19). The reasons for these differences are not currently known. Comparison of the outcomes of first pregnancies showed a higher proportion of premature births, spontaneous abortions, and ectopic pregnancies in the exposed women (P less than 0.001). The difference in the occurrence of ectopic pregnancies was statistically significant (8 versus 0; P less than 0.005). An adverse pregnancy outcome was more likely in DES-exposed women with cervicovaginal ridges. However, when the outcome of all pregnancies were considered, 81% of the exposed women had at least one living child. More exposed women than unexposed women had gynecologic surgical procedures, which may, in part, be due to the increased medical surveillance of the exposed group. The spectrum of diseases at operation in both groups was similar. Adnexal masses and pelvic inflammatory disease were more commonly reported among the exposed women while the occurrence of endometriosis in both groups was similar. For the exposed women who had been examined at the Chicago Lying-In Hospital over a 4-year period, epithelial changes in the vagina had disappeared in 32% and cervicovaginal ridges had disappeared in 57%.

Sources: Reproductive and gynecologic surgical experience in diethylstilbestrol-exposed daughters, NCBI, Dr Herbst A, Dec 1981

More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Adverse Health Outcomes in Women exposed in Utero to DiEthylStilbestrol

In utero exposure of women to DES is associated with a high lifetime risk of a broad spectrum of adverse health outcomes

2011 Study Abstract:

Adverse health outcomes in women exposed in utero to diethylstilbestrol
High lifetime risk of a broad spectrum of adverse health outcomes in the DES Daughters

BACKGROUND:
Before 1971, several million women were exposed in utero to Diethylstilbestrol (DES) given to their mothers to prevent pregnancy complications. Several adverse outcomes have been linked to such exposure, but their cumulative effects are not well understood.

METHODS:
We combined data from three studies initiated in the 1970s with continued long-term follow-up of 4653 women exposed in utero to DES and 1927 unexposed controls. We assessed the risks of 12 adverse outcomes linked to DES exposure, including cumulative risks to 45 years of age for reproductive outcomes and to 55 years of age for other outcomes, and their relationships to the baseline presence or absence of vaginal epithelial changes, which are correlated with a higher dose of, and earlier exposure to, DES in utero.

RESULTS:
Cumulative risks in women exposed to DES, as compared with those not exposed, were as follows:

  • for infertility, 33.3% vs. 15.5% (hazard ratio, 2.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.05 to 2.75)
  • spontaneous abortion, 50.3% vs. 38.6% (hazard ratio, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.42 to 1.88)
  • preterm delivery, 53.3% vs. 17.8% (hazard ratio, 4.68; 95% CI, 3.74 to 5.86)
  • loss of second-trimester pregnancy, 16.4% vs. 1.7% (hazard ratio, 3.77; 95% CI, 2.56 to 5.54)
  • ectopic pregnancy, 14.6% vs. 2.9% (hazard ratio, 3.72; 95% CI, 2.58 to 5.38)
  • preeclampsia, 26.4% vs. 13.7% (hazard ratio 1.42; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.89)
  • stillbirth, 8.9% vs. 2.6% (hazard ratio, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.33 to 4.54)
  • early menopause, 5.1% vs. 1.7% (hazard ratio, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.67 to 3.31)
  • grade 2 or higher cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, 6.9% vs. 3.4% (hazard ratio, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.59 to 3.27)
  • breast cancer at 40 years of age or older, 3.9% vs. 2.2% (hazard ratio, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.04 to 3.18).

For most outcomes, the risks among exposed women were higher for those with vaginal epithelial changes than for those without such changes.

CONCLUSIONS:
In utero exposure of women to DES is associated with a high lifetime risk of a broad spectrum of adverse health outcomes. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute).

Sources:

More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Doctors must be sensitive to Women at Risk of Miscarriage and Ectopic Pregnancy, NICE report says

Ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage: diagnosis and initial management

Doctors must be sensitive to Women at Risk of Miscarriage and Ectopic Pregnancy, NICE report says
Doctors must be more sympathetic to pregnant women in danger of losing their babies, according to NICE

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence believes doctors do not give enough information or support to women at risk of miscarriages or ectopic pregnancies. NICE says that the NHS should consider setting up dedicated services for pregnant women who may have an ectopic pregnancy or who experience pain or bleeding in their first trimester. This is according to their December 2012 guideline on the diagnosis and management of ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage in early pregnancy.

More information:

Sadly for many DES daughters having their own children is not possible! Many of us who have experienced miscarriages, want to have kids but are struggling or unable to…