Bisphenol-A can promote fibroids growth, study says

Bisphenol A promotes the proliferation of leiomyoma cells by GPR30‐EGFR signaling pathway, 2019

Abstract

Aim
To study the molecular mechanism of G protein‐coupled receptor 30‐epidermal growth factor receptor (GPR30‐EGFR) signaling pathway on the proliferation of leiomyoma cells exposed with bisphenol A.

Methods
Primary cultures and subcultures of human uterine leiomyoma (UL) cells. The expressions of messenger RNA and proteins of GPR30 and EGFR in 15 leiomyoma tissue specimens and all groups were detected by real‐time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay and Western blot assay. The protein of mitogen‐activated protein kinases (MAPK)/extracellular signal–regulated kinases (ERK)/c‐fos signaling pathway members was detected by Western blot assay.

Results
Bisphenol A promoted the growth of UL cells and the expressions of GPR30, EGFR, c‐fos and p‐ERK1/2.

Conclusion
Bisphenol A was found to be a promoter specifically to proliferate the human UL cells by activating the transcription and translation of GPR30‐EGFR and MAPK/ERK/c‐fos signaling pathway members.

Personal care product use and breast cancer risk

Associations between Personal Care Product Use Patterns and Breast Cancer Risk among White and Black Women in the Sister Study

New Research from USA NIEHS sister study of 47,000 women, suggests a link between frequent and moderate use of beauty products and breast cancer. The study reviews effects of environment and endocrine disruptors on risks of breast cancer and fibroids.

2018 Study Abstract

Background
Many personal care products include chemicals that might act as endocrine disruptors and thus increase the risk of breast cancer.

Objective
We examined the association between usage patterns of beauty, hair, and skin-related personal care products and breast cancer incidence in the Sister Study, a national prospective cohort study (enrollment 2003–2009).

Methods
Non-Hispanic black (4,452) and white women (n=42,453) were examined separately using latent class analysis (LCA) to identify groups of individuals with similar patterns of self-reported product use in three categories (beauty, skin, hair). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between product use and breast cancer incidence.

Results
A total of 2,326 women developed breast cancer during follow-up (average follow-up=5.4y). Among black women, none of the latent class hazard ratios was elevated, but there were <100 cases in any category, limiting power. Among white women, those classified as “moderate” and “frequent” users of beauty products had increased risk of breast cancer relative to “infrequent” users [HR=1.13 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.27) and HR=1.15 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.30), respectively]. Frequent users of skincare products also had increased risk of breast cancer relative to infrequent users [HR=1.13 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.29)]. None of the hair product classes was associated with increased breast cancer risk. The associations with beauty and skin products were stronger in postmenopausal women than in premenopausal women, but not significantly so.

Conclusions
This work generates novel hypotheses about personal care product use and breast cancer risk. Whether these results are due to specific chemicals or to other correlated behaviors needs to be evaluated.