Le surtraitement lié au dépistage systématique, et les traitements inutiles

~Quand c’est gratuit, c’est vous le produit~
Gérard Delépine, Chirurgien et Cancérologue, septembre 2018

Le dépistage systématique du cancer du sein encouragé par Octobre Rose et les autorités françaises, cause de nombreuses souffrances inutiles, qui rapportent gros à l’industrie du cancer du sein.

Pink Anti-Cancer Food that is Good for You

Pinkwashing and Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Many of the ‘pink’ labelled food sold in October actually can cause cancer!

Many of the ‘pink’ products sold in October actually can cause cancer!

As prevention, these pink anti-cancer foods are a great start.

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Does Pink October Month Causes Breast Cancer?

Straight Facts about PinkWashing

image of pinkwashing-breast-cancer
Many of the ‘pink’ products sold in October actually can cause cancer!

What have all these pink ribbon products and promotions done for men and women living with and at risk of breast cancer?

Actually, many of the ‘pink’ products you purchase actually can cause cancer!

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Pink October : Sheep or Not?

How do you know it’s October? The Pink !

A deadly disease should not be a bottom line booster for Fortune 500 companies. Instead, let’s boost women’s health and self image.

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Au nom de tous les seins

Incertain dépistage organisé

Porté par des enjeux humains et de santé publique, le documentaire suit le parcours de quatre femmes confrontées, un jour, à la peur du cancer du sein. Leurs histoires sont le point de départ d’une enquête scientifique qui bouscule nos certitudes..

Tous les ans au mois d’octobre, la campagne pour le dépistage bat son plein. Mais depuis quelques années, la controverse monte:

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When Carcinogenic Cosmetics are sold to Breast Cancer Victims…

Read Alice’s full story and join her in TAKING ACTION

BreastCancerAction is telling the Personal Care Products Council and the American Cancer Society that “Poison Isn’t Pretty.” @BCAction demand these multi-million dollar industry giants stop pinkwashing and start protecting women’s health.

Look Good, Feel Better is a program run by the Personal Care Products Council and the American Cancer Society; they hold free workshops that give beauty tips and complimentary makeup kits to women in cancer treatment—support that some women understandably value while facing a cancer diagnosis.

The downside? Many of the products offered to women in Look Good, Feel Better make-up kits contain chemicals linked to increased cancer risk and some of the chemicals may actually interfere with breast cancer treatment.

Demand these multi-million dollar industry giants stop pinkwashing and start protecting women’s health.

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Finding Toxic Chemicals linked to Cancer in my Given Cosmetics

Read Katy’s full story and join her in TAKING ACTION

BreastCancerAction is telling the Personal Care Products Council and the American Cancer Society that “Poison Isn’t Pretty.” @BCAction demand these multi-million dollar industry giants stop pinkwashing and start protecting women’s health.

Look Good, Feel Better is a program run by the Personal Care Products Council and the American Cancer Society; they hold free workshops that give beauty tips and complimentary makeup kits to women in cancer treatment—support that some women understandably value while facing a cancer diagnosis.

The downside? Many of the products offered to women in Look Good, Feel Better make-up kits contain chemicals linked to increased cancer risk and some of the chemicals may actually interfere with breast cancer treatment.

Demand these multi-million dollar industry giants stop pinkwashing and start protecting women’s health.

Sources and more information

The Attack of the Pink Ribbons…

After the race…

pink-ribbon-attack
after the race… checkout our posts tagged pinkwashing

Pink Ribbons, Inc. documentary poster

Pink ribbons are everywhere but who is really benefiting?

Pink ribbons are everywhere but who is really benefiting?

Pink ribbons are everywhere and make us feel good, as if we’re all engaged in a successful battle against breast cancer.

But who is really benefiting? After all, more and more women are diagnosed with breast cancer every year. Maybe it’s the companies who wrap their products in pink to gain our admiration (and money)… and wouldn’t it be something if some of the very companies that profit from their pink marketing campaigns have actually contributed to the breast cancer epidemic by selling known carcinogens?

Pink Ribbons, Inc. goes inside the story to reveal those who have co-opted what marketing experts have labeled a “dream cause.”

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Pink Ribbons, Inc.

Breast Cancer and the Politics of Philanthropy

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Breast Cancer and the Politics of Philanthropy

In 2005, more than one million people participated in the Susan G. Komen Foundation’s Race for the Cure, the largest network of 5K runs in the world. Consumers thoughtfully choose products ranging from yogurt to cars, responding to the promise that these purchases will contribute to a cure for the disease. And hundreds of companies and organizations support Breast Cancer Awareness Month, founded by a pharmaceutical company in 1985 and now recognized annually by the president of the United States.

What could be wrong with that? In Pink Ribbons, Inc., Samantha King traces how breast cancer has been transformed from a stigmatized disease and individual tragedy to a market-driven industry of survivorship. In an unprecedented outpouring of philanthropy, corporations turn their formidable promotion machines on the curing of the disease while dwarfing public health prevention efforts and stifling the calls for investigation into why and how breast cancer affects such a vast number of people. Here, for the first time, King questions the effectiveness and legitimacy of privately funded efforts to stop the epidemic among American women. Pink Ribbons, Inc. grapples with issues of gender and race in breast cancer campaigns of businesses such as the National Football League; recounts the legislative history behind the breast cancer awareness postage stamp—the first stamp in American history to raise funds for use outside the U.S. Postal Service; and reveals the cultural impact of activity-based fund-raising, such as the Race for the Cure. Throughout, King probes the profound implications of consumer-oriented philanthropy on how patients experience breast cancer, the research of the biomedical community, and the political and medical institutions that the breast cancer movement seeks to change.

Highly revelatory—at times shocking—Pink Ribbons, Inc. challenges the commercialization of the breast cancer movement, its place in U.S. culture, and its influence on ideas of good citizenship, responsible consumption, and generosity. Samantha King is associate professor of physical and health education and women’s studies at Queen’s University, in Kingston, Ontario.

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