Personal care product use and breast cancer risk

Associations between Personal Care Product Use Patterns and Breast Cancer Risk among White and Black Women in the Sister Study

New Research from USA NIEHS sister study of 47,000 women, suggests a link between frequent and moderate use of beauty products and breast cancer. The study reviews effects of environment and endocrine disruptors on risks of breast cancer and fibroids.

2018 Study Abstract

Background
Many personal care products include chemicals that might act as endocrine disruptors and thus increase the risk of breast cancer.

Objective
We examined the association between usage patterns of beauty, hair, and skin-related personal care products and breast cancer incidence in the Sister Study, a national prospective cohort study (enrollment 2003–2009).

Methods
Non-Hispanic black (4,452) and white women (n=42,453) were examined separately using latent class analysis (LCA) to identify groups of individuals with similar patterns of self-reported product use in three categories (beauty, skin, hair). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between product use and breast cancer incidence.

Results
A total of 2,326 women developed breast cancer during follow-up (average follow-up=5.4y). Among black women, none of the latent class hazard ratios was elevated, but there were <100 cases in any category, limiting power. Among white women, those classified as “moderate” and “frequent” users of beauty products had increased risk of breast cancer relative to “infrequent” users [HR=1.13 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.27) and HR=1.15 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.30), respectively]. Frequent users of skincare products also had increased risk of breast cancer relative to infrequent users [HR=1.13 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.29)]. None of the hair product classes was associated with increased breast cancer risk. The associations with beauty and skin products were stronger in postmenopausal women than in premenopausal women, but not significantly so.

Conclusions
This work generates novel hypotheses about personal care product use and breast cancer risk. Whether these results are due to specific chemicals or to other correlated behaviors needs to be evaluated.

Le flux instinctif libre : une alternative aux protections hygiéniques, serviettes et tampons

Sang tabou : comment j’ai arrêté les tampons

Pouvoir retenir ses règles natutellement, pour les évacuer librement aux toilettes, c’est le principe du flux instinctif libre.
Nina Almberg vous dit tout sur cette méthode étonnante.

  • Sang tabou, un documentaire arte RADIO, 08 mars 2018.
  • Extraits de pubs vintage et textes de :
    • Pline l’Ancien, “Histoire naturelle”, 77 après JC
    • Claude Levi-Strauss, “l’Origine des manières de table”, 1968
    • Coran, sourate II, verset 222, VIIème siècle après JC
    • Saint-Grégoire, “Homélie 29”, Vème siècle après JC
    • Tardieu, “Manuel de pathologie et de clinique médicale”, 1873
    • Séverin Icard, “la Femme pendant la période menstruelle : étude de la psychologie morbide”, 1890
    • Sigmund Freud, “Nouvelle Conférence d’introduction à la psychanalyse”, 1932.

Connaître facilement et rapidement la composition de produits cosmétiques ; c’est possible

Analysons la composition de nos cosmétiques grâce à une app

Aujourd’hui, je vous fait découvrir INCI Beauty : une application mobile d’analyse cosmétique absolument géniale !

Les Essentiels d’Ana, 26 Janvier 2018.

En savoir plus

Analysons la composition de nos cosmétiques

Scanner un produit, s’informer sur un composant

INCI Beauty vous permet d’analyser simplement, rapidement et gratuitement la composition des produits cosmétiques.

  • possibilité de scanner des EAN8 (code barres à 8 chiffres)
  • possibilité de naviguer par catégorie de produit via l’écran de recherche
  • possibilité de rechercher un produit uniquement dans la catégorie sélectionnée
  • possibilité de trier les produits par pertinence, note décroissante (produits les mieux notés en premier) et note croissante
  • possibilité de filtrer les résultats de recherche. Par exemple par marque, par note, lieux de vente, etc.
  • historique des produits que vous avez consultés
  • possibilité de marquer des produits en tant que “Favoris
  • bouton sur l’écran d’accueil permettant d’accéder aux dernières photos prises avec l’application
  • les ingrédients inconnus sont associés à une fleur grise

En savoir plus

Breast Cancer Prevention – How to Reduce Your Risk

Breast Cancer UK works to reduce breast cancer rates by tackling the environmental and chemical causes of the disease

Our lifestyles and our environment are potential contributors to disease. Diet, lack of exercise and exposure to environmental pollutants, including endocrine (hormone) disrupting chemicals (EDCs) present in many everyday products, may increase the risk of hormone related diseases such as breast cancer.

Sources

Endocrine Disruptors

More Information

About The Personal Care Products Safety Act

Bill would help protect consumers from chemicals that disrupt hormones

Endocrine Society applauds new push to regulate chemicals in personal care products

Washington, DCThe Endocrine Society praised the reintroduction of a Senate bill to ensure consumers are protected from hazards associated with exposure to chemicals in personal care products such as cosmetics and lotions.

The Personal Care Products Safety Act, co-sponsored by U.S. Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Susan Collins, would set a rigorous safety standard for personal care products and provide the public with more information about the chemicals in the products they are purchasing. This is an area of concern for the Society and its 18,000 members, including researchers studying how endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) disrupt the body’s hormones.

An EDC is a chemical or mixture of chemicals that can cause adverse health effects by interfering with hormones in the body. There are more than 85,000 manufactured chemicals, of which thousands may be EDCs. EDCs are found in everyday products and throughout the environment.
The evidence is more definitive than ever before that EDCs disrupt hormones in a manner that harms human health. EDC-related health outcomes include male reproductive disorders, premature death, obesity and diabetes, neurological impacts, breast cancer, endometriosis, female reproductive disorders, immune disorders, liver cancer, osteoporosis, Parkinson’s disease, prostate cancer and thyroid disorders.

The Personal Care Products Safety Act calls for some chemicals found in shampoo, deodorant, cosmetics and other personal care products to be reviewed for safety for the first time. The Society applauded the bill’s inclusion of propyl paraben, a potential EDC linked to reproductive disorders, as one of the first five chemicals slated for review.
By providing the necessary authority and fees for the FDA to properly regulate personal care products, the Society believes that this legislation will effectively and efficiently ensure a safer marketplace for personal care products and reduce harms from exposure to EDCs and other toxic chemicals.

Sources and Press Releases

  • Endocrine Society applauds new push to regulate chemicals in personal care products, TheEndoSociety, May 15, 2017.
  • Senators Seek Enhanced Safety Looks at Cosmetic Ingredients, promomarketing, May 15, 2017.
  • Personal Care Products Safety Act Would Improve Cosmetics Safety, ewg.
Endocrine Disruptors

Green is the New Pink

Stop Putting Cancer-causing Chemicals on Your Face

Many beauty ingredients have been linked to breast cancer.

Sources

Endocrine Disruptors

Soins du corps : n’achetez pas de cosmétiques (non bio ou non écologiques)

Biocoop et l’achat responsable, 2014

Le visuel pousse les gens à s’interroger sur leur acte de consommation et sur certains ingrédients des produits cosmétiques et d’hygiène corporelle.

A travers sa campagne 2014 de data-telling, Biocoop poursuivit son discours de sensibilisation sur la portée de l’acte d’achat. Les images présentent des produits de consommation courante et montrent les effets néfastes sur la planète et pour notre santé.

How a little wipe can do BIG harm

Infographic: The Rub with Feminine Wipes

The truth is, wipes may be doing you (and the planet) more harm than good.

This infographic created by womensvoices highlights the fact that chemicals feminine wipes contain may have adverse effects on your health.

Healthy Living – Out and About – Top Tips Card

Prevention starts in your everyday environments

image of Healthy Living - Out and About - Top Tips Card
Prevention starts in your everyday environments.

Read the tips below, then download the printable card to share with friends and family.

1.  Find the right sunscreen
Many sunscreens contain hormone-disrupting chemicals that are bad for us and for aquatic life. Look for ones with non-nanoized titanium dioxide or zinc oxide, and avoid ones with 3-(4-methylbenzylidene)-camphor (4-MBC); octinoxate/octyl- methoxycinnamate (OMC); homosalate (HMS); and oxybenzone.

2.  Find safe ways to fight germs
These days it seems like everything claims to be antibacterial—soaps, toothpaste, clothing, bedding, band-aids, toys, cutting boards—you name it. Chances are, these products contain triclosan, an antimicrobial agent that is suspected of interfering with the hormone systems of humans and wildlife. There’s no evidence that triclosan is more effective than soap and water, so trade in the toxics for some good, old- fashioned elbow grease.

3.  Go chemical-free in your garden
Chemical pesticides are designed to kill pests and weeds, so it’s no surprise that they aren’t good for humans either. And their residue can hang around for years, allowing for ongoing exposure. Ask your garden store about non-toxic alternatives, or look for organic pest- management tips such as DIY recipes that rely on everyday items like vinegar and dish soap.

4.  Join the Breast Cancer Fund to learn the science, get more tips and take action.