Pesticide residues found in 98 percent of Canadian honey samples

Determination of glyphosate, AMPA, and glufosinate in honey by online solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

A new study is the latest evidence that glyphosate herbicides are so pervasive that residues can be found in foods not produced by farmers using glyphosate.

As U.S. regulators continue to dance around the issue of testing foods for residues of glyphosate weed killers, government scientists in Canada have found the pesticide in 197 of 200 samples of honey they examined, Environmental Health News reports, March 22, 2019.

ABSTRACT

A simple method was developed for the simultaneous determination of glyphosate, its main degradation product (aminomethylphosphonic acid), and glufosinate in honey. Aqueous honey solutions were derivatised offline prior to direct analysis of the target analytes using online solid-phase extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Using the developed procedure, accuracies ranging from 95.2% to 105.3% were observed for all analytes at fortification levels of 5, 50, and 150 μg kg−1 with intra-day precisions ranging from 1.6% to 7.2%. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 1 μg kg−1 for each analyte. Two hundred honey samples were analysed for the three analytes with AMPA and glyphosate being most frequently detected (99.0% and 98.5% of samples tested, respectively). The concentrations of glyphosate were found to range from <1 to 49.8 μg kg−1 while those of its degradation product ranged from <1 to 50.1 μg kg−1. The ratio of glyphosate to AMPA was found to vary significantly amongst the samples where both analytes were present above the LOQ. Glufosinate was detected in 125 of 200 samples up to a maximum concentration of 33.0 μg kg−1.

Glyphosate-exposed shows a change in intestinal flora, study

The Ramazzini Institute 13-week pilot study on glyphosate and Roundup administered at human-equivalent dose to Sprague Dawley rats: effects on the microbiome

A study published on May 2018 by an international consortium of researchers, shows a change in intestinal flora in exposed animals, compared to control group. Image credit telegraph.

2019 Study Abstract

Background
Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are broad-spectrum herbicides that act on the shikimate pathway in bacteria, fungi, and plants. The possible effects of GBHs on human health are the subject of an intense public debate for both its potential carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects, including its effects on microbiome. The present pilot study examines whether exposure to GBHs at doses of glyphosate considered to be “safe” (the US Acceptable Daily Intake – ADI – of 1.75 mg/kg bw/day), starting from in utero, may modify the composition of gut microbiome in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats.

Methods
Glyphosate alone and Roundup, a commercial brand of GBHs, were administered in drinking water at doses comparable to the US glyphosate ADI (1.75 mg/kg bw/day) to F0 dams starting from the gestational day (GD) 6 up to postnatal day (PND) 125. Animal feces were collected at multiple time points from both F0 dams and F1 pups. The gut microbiota of 433 fecal samples were profiled at V3-V4 region of 16S ribosomal RNA gene and further taxonomically assigned and assessed for diversity analysis. We tested the effect of exposure on overall microbiome diversity using PERMANOVA and on individual taxa by LEfSe analysis.

Results
Microbiome profiling revealed that low-dose exposure to Roundup and glyphosate resulted in significant and distinctive changes in overall bacterial composition in F1 pups only. Specifically, at PND31, corresponding to pre-pubertal age in humans, relative abundance for Bacteriodetes (Prevotella) was increased while the Firmicutes (Lactobacillus) was reduced in both Roundup and glyphosate exposed F1 pups compared to controls.

Conclusions
This study provides initial evidence that exposures to commonly used GBHs, at doses considered safe, are capable of modifying the gut microbiota in early development, particularly before the onset of puberty. These findings warrant future studies on potential health effects of GBHs in early development such as childhood.

Glyphosate suspected to be an endocrine disruptor

The Ramazzini Institute 13-week pilot study glyphosate-based herbicides administered at human-equivalent dose to Sprague Dawley rats: effects on development and endocrine system

A new study, published on March 12 2019 by an international consortium of researchers, adds a new controversy about this product already suspected of being genotoxic or carcinogenic. Image credit republic.ru.

2019 Study Abstract

Background
Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are broad-spectrum herbicides that act on the shikimate pathway in bacteria, fungi, and plants. The possible effects of GBHs on human health are the subject of an intense public debate for both its potential carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects, including potential effects on the endocrine system The present pilot study examine whether exposure to GBHs at the dose of glyphosate considered to be “safe” (the US Acceptable Daily Intake – ADI – of 1.75 mg/kg bw/day), starting from in utero life, affect the development and endocrine system across different life stages in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats.

Methods
Glyphosate alone and Roundup Bioflow, a commercial brand of GBHs, were administered in drinking water at 1.75 mg/kg bw/day to F0 dams starting from the gestational day (GD) 6 (in utero) up to postnatal day (PND) 120. After weaning, offspring were randomly distributed in two cohorts: 8 M + 8F/group animals belonging to the 6-week cohort were sacrificed after puberty at PND 73 ± 2; 10 M + 10F/group animals belonging to the 13-week cohort were sacrificed at adulthood at PND 125 ± 2. Effects of glyphosate or Roundup exposure were assessed on developmental landmarks and sexual characteristics of pups.

Results
In pups, anogenital distance (AGD) at PND 4 was statistically significantly increased both in Roundup-treated males and females and in glyphosate-treated males. Age at first estrous (FE) was significantly delayed in the Roundup-exposed group and serum testosterone concentration significantly increased in Roundup-treated female offspring from the 13-week cohort compared to control animals. A statistically significant increase in plasma TSH concentration was observed in glyphosate-treated males compared with control animals as well as a statistically significant decrease in DHT and increase in BDNF in Roundup-treated males. Hormonal status imbalances were more pronounced in Roundup-treated rats after prolonged exposure.

Conclusions
The present pilot study demonstrate that GBHs exposure, from prenatal period to adulthood, induced endocrine effects and altered reproductive developmental parameters in male and female SD rats. In particular, it was associated with androgen-like effects, including a statistically significant increase of AGDs in both males and females, delay of FE and increased testosterone in female.

Les liens entre les industries agroalimentaire et pharmaceutique

Interview de Vandana Shiva, Brut, Février 2019

Selon Vandana Shiva, des multinationales s’enrichissent en vendant des médicaments pour soigner des maladies qu’elles ont elles-mêmes provoquées.

L’écologiste Vandana Shiva dénonce le “cartel du poison”, Brut, Février 2019.

Paul François, un agriculteur contre Monsanto

Interview Brut, Février 2019

Paul François avait réussi à faire condamner Monsanto, puis la Cour de cassation a cassé le jugement.

Aujourd’hui, Paul François entame son 4ème procès contre le géant des OGM et continue de se battre pour une agriculture responsable et l’arrêt de l’utilisation du glyphosate. Il raconte.

Élise Lucet sur le glyphosate

Interview Brut, Janvier 2019

Envoyé spécial a consacré une soirée spéciale au glyphosate le jeudi 17 janvier à 21h sur France 2

Atteint d’un cancer incurable, l’Américain Dewayne Johnson a attaqué en justice Monsanto. C’est le premier au monde à avoir gagné un procès contre le géant américain. Elise Lucet raconte toute l’histoire pour Brut.

Duel : faut-il interdire le glyphosate ?

Un pro et un anti-glyphosate répondent sur Brut nature FR, 2019

Vincent est céréalier-betteravier et il travaille sans labour. Il utilise le glyphosate uniquement entre 2 cultures vivrières, pour tuer les mauvaises herbes et stopper la croissance de cultures intermédiaires qu’il utilise ensuite pour nourrir ses sols.

Benoît est éleveur et céréalier en agriculture biologique. Il n’utilise plus de pesticides et d’engrais de synthèse et affirme n’utiliser aucun pesticides naturels. Il ne pratique plus le labour depuis 2007.

Pas de glyphosate dans ma Teucha !!!

Les tampons et serviettes hygiéniques contiennent toujours des résidus chimiques

De nouvelles analyses mettent en évidence la présence récurrente de pesticides et de phtalates dans les protections périodiques féminines malgré les dernières recommandations officielles.

  • Le Billet de Sophia Aram, franceinter, 25 février 2019.
  • Tampons et serviettes : connaître la composition, c’est coton ! 60millions-mag, 2019/02/21.
  • Tampons et protections féminines : un rapport ni alarmant ni rassurant, 60millions-mag, 2018/07/20.
  • Tampons et protections féminines : une réglementation s’impose ! 60millions-mag, 2016/02/23.

Exposure to Glyphosate-Based Herbicides and Risk for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

A Meta-Analysis and Supporting Evidence, Mutation Research/Reviews, February 2019

Abstract

Glyphosate is the most widely used broad-spectrum systemic herbicide in the world. Recent evaluations of the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) by various regional, national, and international agencies have engendered controversy.

We investigated whether there was an association between high cumulative exposures to GBHs and increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in humans. We conducted a new meta-analysis that included the most recent update of the Agricultural Health Study (AHS) cohort published in 2018 along with five case-control studies.

Using the highest exposure groups when available in each study, we report the overall meta-relative risk (meta-RR) of NHL in GBH-exposed individuals was increased by 41% (meta-RR = 1.41, 95% CI, confidence interval: 1.13–1.75). For comparison, we also performed a secondary meta-analysis using high-exposure groups with the earlier AHS (2005), and we determined a meta-RR for NHL of 1.45 (95% CI: 1.11–1.91), which was higher than the meta-RRs reported previously. Multiple sensitivity tests conducted to assess the validity of our findings did not reveal meaningful differences from our primary estimated meta-RR. To contextualize our findings of an increased NHL risk in individuals with high GBH exposure, we reviewed available animal and mechanistic studies, which provided supporting evidence for the carcinogenic potential of GBH. We documented further support from studies of malignant lymphoma incidence in mice treated with pure glyphosate, as well as potential links between GBH exposure and immunosuppression, endocrine disruption, and genetic alterations that are commonly associated with NHL.

Overall, in accordance with evidence from experimental animal and mechanistic studies, our current meta-analysis of human epidemiological studies suggests a compelling link between exposures to GBHs and increased risk for NHL.

 

Reference. Image credit gmwatch.

La désinformation organisée par les firmes doit cesser, dit Maître Lafforgue

Comment Monsanto assure sa défense et nie en bloc toute responsabilité devant la justice

“Les médecins qui mettent en doute les troubles de M. François ne sont pas des experts judiciaires, ce sont des consultants payés par Monsanto.”

dénonce Maître François Lafforgue, l’avocat de Paul François.

La Cour d’appel de Lyon doit se prononcer sur la responsabilité présumée de Monsanto dans les troubles médicaux de Paul François, céréalier charentais. Depuis douze ans, il accuse la firme d’avoir exposé les utilisateurs du Lasso, puissant herbicide, à de graves dangers.

France 3 Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, un reportage de Yaëlle Marie et Laure Crozat publié sur YouTube le 6 février 2019.

Référence : Lyon : Comment Monsanto assure sa défense et nie en bloc toute responsabilité devant la justice ?